Moon Martin – Rolene

From Bestclassicbands.com

Moon Martin, a singer-songwriter, guitarist and power pop performer best known for his song “Bad Case of Loving You,” a 1979 hit for Robert Palmer, died on May 11, 2020. Neither the location nor cause of death was known. His death was confirmed by Tulsa World and Craig Leon, who produced several of his albums. Martin was 74 (though some reports say he was 69).

Born John David Martin on Oct. 31, 1945 – the nickname “Moon” came from his propensity to use the word in his song lyrics – Martin released a series of albums for Capitol Records, beginning in the late ’70s. The power pop artist earned a pair of modest chart hits in 1979, “Rolene” (#30) and “No Chance” (#50), both from his Escape From Domination album.

Martin was born in Altus, Okla. After attending the Univ. of Oklahoma, he went to Los Angeles, where his scant biographical materials indicated that he briefly performed with Linda Ronstadt’s band. Her longtime producer and manager, John Boylan, confirmed this to blogger Bob Lefsetz:

“At Linda’s suggestion, I hired him to be in her band for one Troubadour gig in 1971,” he wrote. “The rest of the band consisted of Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Michael Bowden (on bass), Byron Berline on occasional fiddle, and me on occasional acoustic guitar or Wurlitzer electric piano. I recorded three or four sets for a possible live album, using the old Wally Heider truck, but nothing came of it. We did release one track – a version of “Rescue Me,” and it shows Moon’s uncanny ability to add something fresh while still fitting in. He takes a very rock and roll approach to an R and B song and it works great.”

The song reached #30 on Billboards Hot 100 chart in 1979. Moon Martin also wrote the song “Bad Case of Loving You” that Robert Palmer had a big hit with that went to #14 on the Hot 100 charts also in 1979.

 

Rolene

Come on operator gimme Rolene on my line
She knows what I need to ease a cravin’ in my spine
A cheerleaders smile
Tijuana style
Your daddy might be judge
Sure know how to nudge

All right Rolene
Rolene
Rolene

Well, I’ve been livin’ so white and clean
Jack, it’s made me mean
I need Rolene’s smooth, round thigh
It’s like a rush to get me high
I give it my best shot
Honey, all I got
My name may not be Hud
But I’ll show you I’m no dud

All right Rolene
Rolene
Rolene

You know my baby’s love
Just like a sweet velvet glove
Honey, crack that whip
Ya make me bite my lip

Paul McCartney and Wings – With A Little Luck

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Big/Large/Little/Small/Tall/Tiny.

From his 1978 album, London Town. The song peaked at #5 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on May 19, 1978.

From Songfacts

The song was long, 5:45, but radio stations were for the most part content to play the unedited single, even though edited promos were sent out.
There were 2 versions of the song, the original unedited 5:45 album version, which radio stations were for the most part content to play and the edited DJ version, which only runs for 3:13.
This was written on Paul McCartney’s farm in Scotland. Most of this song was recorded on a motor yacht called the Fair Carol in the Virgin Islands along with several other tracks on London Town. The yacht had a mobile 24-track recording studio installed on it, and when they weren’t recording McCartney, his family and the band lived on three other yachts. The song was then finished off back in London.

Thinking of the water bound sessions, they planned to call the album “Water Wings.”

The lyrics do not convey a political or social message, but McCartney has no problem with Silly Love Songs.

With A Little Luck

With a little luck we can help it out
We can make this whole damn thing work out
With a little love we can lay it down
Can’t you feel the town exploding

There is no end to what we can do together
There is no end
The willow turns his back on inclement weather
And if he can do it we can do it

Just me and you
And a little luck we can clear it up
We can bring it in for a landing
With a little luck we can turn it on
There can be no misunderstanding

There is no end to what we can do together
There is no end
The willow turns his back on inclement weather
And if he can do it

Just me and you
With a little push we could set it off
We can send it rocketing skywards
With a little love we could shake it up
Don’t you feel the comet exploding

With a little luck, with a little luck
With a little luck, a little luck, a little luck

With a little love, we can lay it down
Can’t you feel the town exploding
With a little push, we could set it off
We could send it rocketing skywards

With a little love, we could shake it up
Don’t you feel the comet exploding forwardsWriter/s: PAUL MCCARTNEY
P

Meat Loaf – Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…A song that includes a number.

From his 1977 album, Bat Out Of Hell. The song reached #11 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on August 7, 1978.

From Songfacts

“Two out of three ain’t bad” is a trite cliché often used for comic effect. (“How was your date?” “He was tall, handsome, and incredibly boring.” “Well, two out of three ain’t bad.)

Jim Steinman, who was Meat Loaf’s songwriter, turned the saying into a song about the elusive nature of love. The song begins with Meat Loaf getting kicked to the curb by his girl, presumably because he won’t tell her he loves her. He makes the case that even though he will never love her, he’s good enough, since after all he does want her and need her, and happy endings are only for fairy tales.

We then learn that his commitment issues step from a previous relationship – one with the only woman he will ever love. She once left him with the same explanation: I want you, I need you, but I’ll never love you.

Jim Steinman wrote this song after his friend, the actress Mimi Kennedy, suggested that he write a ballad along the lines of the Elvis Presley song “I Want You, I Need You, I Love You.” She was implying that he should write something straightforward and simple, but Steinman doesn’t work that way. He used the phrase, but added a degree of Shakespearean drama that was typical of his work.

In America, this was the second single released from the Bat Out Of Hell album. The first single, “You Took the Words Right Out of My Mouth,” didn’t chart, but by the time “Two Out of Three” was issued in March 1978, the album was picking up steam and the song rose up the charts, peaking at #11 on July 8.

The single was edited down to 3:58 from the 5:23 album version.

Todd Rundgren produced the Bat Out Of Hell album. On this song, he used the other three members of his band Utopia: Kasim Sulton on bass, Willie Wilcox on drums, and Roger Powell on synthesizer. Rundgren played guitar and also sang backup on this one.
This song got a big boost when Meat Loaf performed it on Saturday Night Live on March 25, 1978.

Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad

Baby we can talk all night
But that ain’t getting us nowhere
I told you everything I possibly can
There’s nothing left inside of here

And maybe you can cry all night
But that’ll never change the way that I feel
The snow is really piling up outside
I wish you wouldn’t make me leave here

I poured it on and I poured it out
I tried to show you just how much I care
I’m tired of words and I’m too hoarse to shout
But you’ve been cold to me so long
I’m crying icicles instead of tears

And all I can do is keep on telling you
I want you
I need you
But there ain’t no way
I’m ever gonna love you
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad

You’ll never find your gold on a sandy beach
You’ll never drill for oil on a city street
I know you’re looking for a ruby
In a mountain of rocks
But there ain’t no Coupe de Ville hiding
At the bottom of a Cracker Jack box

I can’t lie
I can’t tell you that I’m something I’m not
No matter how I try
I’ll never be able to give you something
Something that I just haven’t got

There’s only one girl that I have ever loved
And that was so many years ago
And though I know I’ll never get her out of my heart
She never loved me back, ooh I know
I remember how she left me on a stormy night
She kissed me and got out of our bed
And though I pleaded and I begged her
Not to walk out that door
She packed her bags and turned right away

And she kept on telling me
She kept on telling me
She kept on telling me
I want you
I need you
But there ain’t no way
I’m ever gonna love you
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad
I want you
I need you
But there ain’t no way I’m ever gonna love you
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad
Don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad

Baby we can talk all night
But that ain’t getting us nowhere

Writer/s: JIM STEINMAN

Smokie – Mexican Girl

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Burrito/Fajita/Mexican/Tequila

From their 1978 album, The Montreux Album. The song reached #19 on UK’s singles chart.

Mexican Girl

Juanita came to me last night and she cried over and over
Ooh, Daddy I love you you know and I think it’s the moonlight
She looked so fine, well she looked alright and she moaned
Ooh, Daddy move over
Oh, baby you know what I like and I think it’s the moonlight
Made in Mexico, schooled in France ooh la lovin’
She needed no teachin’
Oh man, I can say international ways, I believe in
Mexican girl, don’t leave me alone
I got a heart as big as a stone and I need you, believe me
To be here and love me tonight
Mexican girl, I want you to stay, you know my heart is
Longing to say that as long as I live I will always
Remember the one that I called my Mexican girl
Her skin was soft as the velvet sky
And her hair it shone in the moonlight
As the music did play well the night turned to day
And I held her tight
Then she looked at me with her dark brown eyes and she
Whispered, “Hasta La Vista!”
I don’t know what it means but it sounded so good so
I kissed her
Mexican girl, don’t leave me alone
I got a heart as big as a stone and I need you, believe me
To be here and love me tonight
Mexican girl I want you to stay, you know my heart is
Longing to say that as long as I live I will always
Remember the one that I called my
Mexican girl, don’t leave me alone
I got a heart as big as a stone and I need you, believe me
To be here and love me tonight
Mexican girl I want you to stay, you know my heart is
Longing to say that as long as I live I will always
Remember the one that I called
My Mexican girl
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Alan Silson / Christopher Ward Norman / Peter David Spencer / Terence David Littley

Chicago -Baby, What a Big Surprise

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Birthday/Cake/Gift/Party/Surprise.

From their 1977 album, Chicago XI. The song peaked at #4 on Billboard’s HOT 100 chart on December 2, 1977.

Baby, What a Big Surprise

Right before my very eyes
I thought that you were only fakin’ it
And like before my heart was takin’ it
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Yesterday it seemed to me
My life was nothing more than wasted time
But here today you’ve softly changed my mind
Baby, what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes, oh, oh
Oh, woah, oh, oh
Just to be alone
Was a little more than I could take
Then you came to stay, oh
Hold me in the morning
Love me in the afternoon
Help me find my way, hey yeah
Now and then just like before
I think about the love I’ve thrown away
But now it doesn’t matter anyway
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Peter P. Cetera

AC/DC – Touch Too Much

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Touch/Feel.

From their 1979 album, Highway To Hell. The song reached #29 on the UK’s singles chart in 1980. It did not chart in America.

From Songfacts

This is about the dangers of excess, which the band was quite familiar with. They were notorious for their wild parties, girls, and drinking. Lead singer Bon Scott drank himself to death six months after this was released.
Released as a single, this became just the second AC/DC song to chart in the UK, following “Rock ‘N’ Roll Damnation,” which made #24.
Bon Scott’s last performance was when he lip-synched this song when the band performed it on Top of the Pops, a popular British music show. The show aired February 7, 1980; Scott died 12 days later.
Considering how many of their songs are about drinking, it is surprising that AC/DC guitarist Angus Young didn’t touch the stuff. When he was young, a bad encounter with Bond 7 Australian whiskey turned him off from alcohol.

 

Touch Too Much

It was one of those nights
When you turned out the lights
And everything comes into view
She was taking her time
I was losing my mind
There was nothing that she wouldn’t do
It wasn’t the first
It wasn’t the last
She knew we was making love
I was so satisfied
Deep down inside
Like a hand in a velvet glove

Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Too much for my body, too much for my brain
This kind of woman’s gonna drive me insane
She’s got a touch, a touch too much

She had the face of an angel
Smiling with sin
A body of Venus with arms
Dealing with danger
Stroking my skin
Let the thunder and lightening start
It wasn’t the first
It wasn’t the last
It wasn’t that she didn’t care
She wanted it hard
And wanted it fast
She liked it done medium rare

Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Too much for my body, too much for my brain
This kind of woman’s gonna drive me insane
She’s got a touch, a touch too much

Seems like a touch, touch too much
You know it’s much too much, much too much
I really want to feel your touch too much
Girl you know you’re getting me much too much
Seems like a touch
Just a dirty little touch
I really need your touch
‘Cause you’re much too much too much

Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Too much for my body, too much for my brain
This kind of woman’s gonna drive me insane
She’s got a touch, a touch too much Writer/s: RONALD BELFORD SCOTT, ANGUS MCKINNON YOUNG, MALCOLM MITCHELL YOUNG

Eric Clapton – Promises

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Promise/Vow/Oath.

From his 1978 album, Backless. The song peaked at #9 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on January 19, 1979.

From rbhsjukebox

This song was written by Richard Feldman and Roger Linn. It features a wonderful harmony vocal from long-time Clapton collaborator (and frequent co-writer) Marcy Levy. She is perhaps better known as Marcella Detroit, the name she assumed as half of the short-lived but massively successful duo Shakespears Sister. Clapton’s vocal is nicely delivered, with just the right bitterness for the lyrics, and Levy’s accompaniment bolsters it perfectly.

Ironically titled, Promises is about broken oaths and the end of a relationship. It’s well-constructed, a perfect three-minute pop song, handled smoothly by a seasoned performer and his sympathetic band.

One other note, Roger Linn invented the first drum machine.

Promises

I don’t care if you never come home
I don’t mind if you just keep on rowin’ away on a distant sea
‘Cause I don’t love you and you don’t love me
You cause a commotion when you come to town
You give ’em a smile and they melt
And your lovers and friends is all good and fine
But I don’t like yours and you don’t like mine
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
I don’t care what you do at night
Oh, I don’t care how you get you delites
We’ll leave it alone and just let it be
I don’t love you and you don’t love me
I got a problem, can you relate
I got a woman callin’ love hate
We made a vow we’d always be friends
How could we know that promises end
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
I tried to love for years upon years
You refuse to take me for real
It’s time you saw what I want you to see
I’d still love you if you’d just love me
I got a problem, can you relate
I got a woman callin’ love hate
We made a vow we’d always be friends
How could we know that promises end
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Wohoo, la la la la la la la

Dennis Brown – Wichita Lineman

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…North/South/East/West

The single was released on January 1, 1971. This may be one of the best covers ever recorded. It is stripped down and not polished like Glen Campbell’s original version.

From Songfacts

In a Songfacts interview with Jimmy Webb, he explained how he puts himself into the shoes of the subjects of this songs. Said Webb: “I’ve never worked with high-tension wires or anything like that. My characters were all ordinary guys. They were all blue-collar guys who did ordinary jobs. As Billy Joel likes to say, which is pretty accurate, he said, ‘They’re ordinary people thinking extraordinary thoughts.’ I always appreciated that comment, because I thought it was very close to what I was doing or what I was trying to do. And they came from ordinary towns. They came from places like Galveston and Wichita and places like that.

No, I never worked for the phone company. But then, I’m not a journalist. I’m not Woody Guthrie. I’m a songwriter and I can write about anything I want to. I feel that you should know something about what you’re doing and you should have an image, and I have a very specific image of a guy I saw working up on the wires out in the Oklahoma panhandle one time with a telephone in his hand talking to somebody. And this exquisite aesthetic balance of all these telephone poles just decreasing in size as they got further and further away from the viewer – that being me – and as I passed him, he began to diminish in size. The country is so flat, it was like this one quick snapshot of this guy rigged up on a pole with this telephone in his hand. And this song came about, really, from wondering what that was like, what it would be like to be working up on a telephone pole and what would you be talking about? Was he talking to his girlfriend? Probably just doing one of those checks where they called up and said, ‘Mile marker 46,’ you know. ‘Everything’s working so far.'”

Wichita Lineman

I am a lineman for the county
And I drive the main road
Searchin’ in the sun for another overload
I hear you singin’ in the wire
I can hear you through the whine
And the Wichita lineman is still on the line

I know I need a small vacation
But it don’t look like rain
And if it snows that stretch down south
Won’t ever stand the strain
And I need you more than want you
And I want you for all time
And the Wichita lineman is still on the line

And I need you more than want you
And I want you for all time
And the Wichita lineman is still on the line Writer/s: Jimmy Webb

Rick James – You And I

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…I/Me/Them/Us/You/We.

From his 1978 album, Come Get It. The song reached #13 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on September 22, 1978.

You And I

You and I, we fit together like a glove on a hand
That’s right, don’t you know
That I would gladly take you anywhere you wanted to go.
You and me are as close as three part harmony, wouldn’t you agree?
And in the chance our romance ended it would surely be the end of me.
Some people might say I’m infatuated, I don’t care
‘Cause they really don’t know
They’ll never see or hear the things I do with you.
So far as I’m concerned they all can go to hell.
Woh, woh, woh, woh baby cakes, now swing it sugar.
Do, do, do, do, do, just swing it baby,
You and I, will be together until the six is nine, that’s right.
When you need me I never hesitate,
I always come, it’s so much fun. Yeah!
You and I, although we’re poor our love has brought
More wealth than Hughes, himself
And if by chance there is an afterlife when we die
You and I, I’ll spend it with you
Some people might say I’m infatuated, I don’t care
‘Cause they really don’t know
They’ll never see or hear the things I do with you.
So far as I’m concerned they all can go to hell.
Woh, woh, woh, woh, baby cakes, now swing it sugar.
Do, do, do, do, do, just swing it baby, Can’t take it baby
You and I, you and me are going to be together eternally
You and I, you and me are going to be together eternally
You and I, you and me are going to be together eternally
Yeah, yeah, yeah
You and I, you and me
Dance girl, ev’rybody on the floor, ev’rybody dance on the floor
Dance on the floor, ev’rybody dance on the floor, hey, you over there
Ev’rybody dance on the floor, ev’rybody dance on the floor
Now shake it on down.
Ev’rybody dance on the floor, ev’rybody dance on the floor
Shake your bootie now, ev’rybody shake your bootie now.
ev’rybody shake your bootie now.
Do, do do do do do do do do do do
Ev’rybody dance on the floor, dance ya’ll
Ev’rybody dance on the floor, come on baby, all right
Dance, dance, dance and shout, let’s dance and shout
Get on the floor ya’ll, dance and shout, don’t just stand there yeah!
Dance and shout, don’t just stand there, yeah!
Dance ya’ll, dance and shout
The latest groove so you can move on the floor
Ev’rybody dance on the floor
The latest groove so you can move on the floor
Ev’rybody dance on the floor
The latest groove so you can move on the floor
Ev’rybody dance on the floor
Ev’rybody lay your bootie down, ev’rybody shake your bootie now.
Can’t hear you, shout, ev’rybody shake your bootie now
Ev’rybody shake your bootie now, ev’rybody shake your bootie now.
Shake it on down, shake your bootie now
Ev’rybody dance on the floor, do, do, do,
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Rick James

Peter Frampton – Baby, I Love Your Way

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Babe/Cutie/Doll/Honey/Sweetie.

From his 1976 album, Frampton Comes Alive. The song reached #12 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on August 27, 1976.

From Songfacts

This is a very romantic love ballad. Frampton is telling his girl that he loves everything about her and wants to be with her day and night.
This went nowhere when Frampton first released it as a single in 1975. The next year, he included it on his live album, Frampton Comes Alive, and it helped the album become a huge hit. The live version was the second single released from the album, after “Show Me The Way” and before “Do You Feel Like We Do.”
Lisa Bonet sings this in the 2000 movie High Fidelity. John Cusack’s character hates the song until he hears her sing it.

Baby, I Love Your Way

Shadows grow so long before my eyes
And they’re moving across the page
Suddenly the day turns into night
Far away from the city but don’t hesitate
‘Cause your love won’t wait hey
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way every day
Want to be with you night and day

Moon appears to shine and light the sky
With the help of some fireflies
I wonder how they have the power shine shine shine
I can see them under the pines
But don’t hesitate ’cause your love won’t wait hey
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way every day
Want to be with you night and day uh yeah

But don’t hesitate ’cause your love won’t wait
I can see the sunset in your eyes
Brown and grey and blue besides
Clouds are stalking islands in the sun
Wish I could dry one out of season
But don’t hesitate ’cause your love won’t wait hey
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way uuhh
Want to be with you night and day
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way uuhh
Want to be with you night and day

Writer/s: Peter Kenneth Frampton