Jethro Tull – Bungle In The Jungle

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Alligator/Crocodile/Lizard/Snake/Turtle.

From their 1974 album, War Child. The song reached #12 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on January 10, 1975.

From Songfacts

  • This is perhaps the best-known song from Jethro Tull’s War Child album. War Child was originally written to be the soundtrack for a film which never got made. The outline of the movie, posted on the official Jethro Tull website, goes into details of the film: A black comedy about a dead teenage girl visiting Heaven and her various misadventures in the afterlife. May we humbly recommend Terry Gilliam to direct?

    “Bungle in the Jungle” actually came from an earlier project. Ian Anderson told us in a Songfacts interview: “It was actually late ’72 or early ’73 when I was in Paris recording an album that never got released, although one or two of the tracks made it out in 1974, but that was at a time when I was writing an album that was exploring people, the human condition, through analogies with the animal kingdom. And that particular song was perhaps the more obvious and the more catchy of the tunes. Eventually it was finished and saved in time for the War Child album, sometime later.”

    The War Child album peaked at #2 on the Billboard Albums chart.
  • In the same interview, Anderson also clears up the matter of which came first: this song, or the World Heavyweight Championship boxing match between George Foreman and Muhammad Ali, known as “Rumble in the Jungle” because of its Zaire location. While he’s not sure if the song was released before the boxing match, Anderson knows that the song was written well ahead of it. He says, “Since ‘Bungle in the Jungle’ had been released in the year 1974 on the War Child album, ‘rumble in the jungle’ may have been taken from that. Because that took place on the 30th of October in 1974. Maybe they were alluding to what was a well-played song, even on AM radio.”

Bungle In The Jungle

Walking through forests of palm tree apartments
Scoff at the monkeys who live in their dark tents
Down by the waterhole
Drunk every Friday
Eating their nuts
Saving their raisins for Sunday.
Lions and tigers
Who wait in the shadows
They’re fast but they’re lazy, and sleep in green meadows

Let’s bungle in the jungle
Well, that’s all right by me
I’m a tiger when I want love
But I’m a snake if we disagree

Just say a word and the boys will be right there
With claws at your back to send a chill through the night air
Is it so frightening to have me at your shoulder?
Thunder and lightning couldn’t be bolder
I’ll write on your tombstone,I thank you for dinner
This game that we animals play is a winner

Let’s bungle in the jungle
Well, that’s all right by me
I’m a tiger when I want love
But I’m a snake if we disagree

The rivers are full of crocodile nastiest
And He who made kittens put snakes in the grass
He’s a lover of life but a player of pawns
Yes, the King on His sunset lies waiting for dawn
To light up His Jungle as play is resumed
The monkeys seem willing to strike up the tune

Let’s bungle in the jungle
Well, that’s all right by me
I’m a tiger when I want love
But I’m a snake if we disagree

The Boomtown Rats – I Don’t Like Mondays

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Days of the Week.

From their 1979 album, The Fine Art of Surfacing. The song reached #73 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart and #1 on the UK’s singles chart.

From Songfacts

This is about Brenda Spencer, a 16-year-old high school student who lived across the street from Cleveland Elementary School in San Diego, California. On Monday, January 29, 1979, she opened fire on the school with a rifle her father had given her for Christmas, killing two adults (including the principal) and injuring nine children before going back to her home. Police surrounded her home and waited for seven hours until she gave herself up. In that time, she spoke with a reporter on the phone. When asked why she did it, she replied, “I just started shooting, that’s it. I just did it for the fun of it. I just don’t like Mondays. I just did it because it’s a way to cheer the day up. Nobody likes Mondays.”

This was #1 hit in 32 different countries, but it flopped in America, probably because the subject matter hit too close to home. Gun violence is a big problem in America.

At a basic level, this is often heard as a song lamenting the beginning of the work week. Some radio stations play it every Monday at a certain time.

Group leader Bob Geldof wrote this. He went on to organize charity efforts Band Aid, Live Aid and Live 8, earning a KBE (the equivalent of knighthood given to people born outside of England) for his efforts. The Boomtown Rats played this as part of their set at Live Aid.

While in Atlanta touring, Bob Geldof heard the news story about Brenda Spencer. Geldof composed the song on the spot, originally as a reggae number. Back in Los Angeles after the tour, a studio demo was recorded with grand piano and vocals. By the time ‘I Don’t Like Mondays’ was introduced onstage in Loch Lomond, Scotland, the song had been transformed dramatically.

 

I Don’t Like Mondays

The silicon chip inside her head
Gets switched to overload
And nobody’s gonna go to school today
She’s going to make them stay at home
And daddy doesn’t understand it
He always said she was as good as gold
And he can see no reason
‘Cause there are no reasons
What reason do you need to be sureOh, oh, oh tell me why
I don’t like MondaysTell me why
I don’t like MondaysTell me why
I don’t like Mondays
I want to shoot
The whole day downThe Telex machine is kept so clean
As it types to a waiting world
And mother feels so shocked
Father’s world is rocked
And their thoughts turn to their own little girl
Sweet sixteen ain’t that peachy keen
Now, it ain’t so neat to admit defeat
They can see no reasons
‘Cause there are no reasons
What reason do you need oh, woahTell me why
I don’t like MondaysTell me why
I don’t like MondaysTell me why
I don’t like Mondays
I want to shoot
The whole day down
Down, down
Shoot it all downAll the playing’s stopped in the playground now
She wants to play with her toys a while
And school’s out early and soon we’ll be learning
And the lesson today is how to die
And then the bullhorn crackles
And the captain tackles
With the problems and the how’s and why’s
And he can see no reasons
‘Cause there are no reasons
What reason do you need to die, dieOh, oh, oh and the silicon chip inside her head
Gets switched to overload
And nobody’s gonna go to school today
She’s going to make them stay at home
And daddy doesn’t understand it
He always said she was as good as gold
And he can see no reason
‘Cause there are no reasons
What reason do you need to be sureTell me why
I don’t like Mondays
Tell me whyI don’t like Mondays
Tell me whyI don’t like, I don’t like, I don’t like Mondays
Tell me why
I don’t like, I don’t like, (tell me why) I don’t like Mondays
Tell me why
I don’t like Mondays
I want to shoot, the whole day down, uh, uh, uh

Source: LyricFindSongwriters: Bob Geldof

Elvis Presley – The Next Step Is Love

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Baking/Bread/Cake/Pie/Picnic.

From his 1970 album, That’s The Way It Is. The song reached #32 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on August 28, 1970. It was recorded on June 7, 1970, at RCA Studio B in Nashville.

From Songfacts

Released as a single with “I’ve Lost You,” this was the last song Paul Evans wrote for Elvis (he co-wrote it with Paul Parnes). Evans is a prolific songwriter who had novelty hits as an artist with “Seven Little Girls (Sitting In The Back Seat)” and “Happy-Go-Lucky Me.” When writing for Elvis, Evans points out that he had to be very careful with the demos because Elvis’ producers would often use the whole arrangement, not just the song. In this song, he used piccolo trumpets on the demo, which made it to the record. Says Evans: “Who knows? If we had put a tuba on it and they liked it, they would have put a tuba on it. Or if they didn’t like it, they wouldn’t have done the song. They had to like the package, the ambience of the demo, so we would have to do our best to give them our interpretation of what they would do, with a smaller group of people.

The Next Step Is Love

Yesterday I slipped away
The sun is welcoming the evening shadows
On a perfect day and the next step is love
The next step is love
We walked barefoot through the misty meadows
Laughing at each other in the rain
Made some faces at some people in the park
Didn’t bother to explain
Fun, fun, look at us run
Going nowhere special really fast
But we’ve yet to taste the icing on the cake
That we’ve been baking with the past
And the next step is love
So what are we waiting for?
The next step is love
Girl, it’s for sure
Love will be a place to run to
From the world they’ve built to you and me
We’ll be closer than we’ve ever been
Though, looking back, it’s so hard to believe
Hang it all out or bring it all in
The best we’ve picked upon the way tonight
Changes are coming, but together
We can make it through somehow
Yes, the next step is love
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Paul Evans / Paul Parnes

Moon Martin – Rolene

From Bestclassicbands.com

Moon Martin, a singer-songwriter, guitarist and power pop performer best known for his song “Bad Case of Loving You,” a 1979 hit for Robert Palmer, died on May 11, 2020. Neither the location nor cause of death was known. His death was confirmed by Tulsa World and Craig Leon, who produced several of his albums. Martin was 74 (though some reports say he was 69).

Born John David Martin on Oct. 31, 1945 – the nickname “Moon” came from his propensity to use the word in his song lyrics – Martin released a series of albums for Capitol Records, beginning in the late ’70s. The power pop artist earned a pair of modest chart hits in 1979, “Rolene” (#30) and “No Chance” (#50), both from his Escape From Domination album.

Martin was born in Altus, Okla. After attending the Univ. of Oklahoma, he went to Los Angeles, where his scant biographical materials indicated that he briefly performed with Linda Ronstadt’s band. Her longtime producer and manager, John Boylan, confirmed this to blogger Bob Lefsetz:

“At Linda’s suggestion, I hired him to be in her band for one Troubadour gig in 1971,” he wrote. “The rest of the band consisted of Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Michael Bowden (on bass), Byron Berline on occasional fiddle, and me on occasional acoustic guitar or Wurlitzer electric piano. I recorded three or four sets for a possible live album, using the old Wally Heider truck, but nothing came of it. We did release one track – a version of “Rescue Me,” and it shows Moon’s uncanny ability to add something fresh while still fitting in. He takes a very rock and roll approach to an R and B song and it works great.”

The song reached #30 on Billboards Hot 100 chart in 1979. Moon Martin also wrote the song “Bad Case of Loving You” that Robert Palmer had a big hit with that went to #14 on the Hot 100 charts also in 1979.

 

Rolene

Come on operator gimme Rolene on my line
She knows what I need to ease a cravin’ in my spine
A cheerleaders smile
Tijuana style
Your daddy might be judge
Sure know how to nudge

All right Rolene
Rolene
Rolene

Well, I’ve been livin’ so white and clean
Jack, it’s made me mean
I need Rolene’s smooth, round thigh
It’s like a rush to get me high
I give it my best shot
Honey, all I got
My name may not be Hud
But I’ll show you I’m no dud

All right Rolene
Rolene
Rolene

You know my baby’s love
Just like a sweet velvet glove
Honey, crack that whip
Ya make me bite my lip

Paul McCartney and Wings – With A Little Luck

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Big/Large/Little/Small/Tall/Tiny.

From his 1978 album, London Town. The song peaked at #5 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on May 19, 1978.

From Songfacts

The song was long, 5:45, but radio stations were for the most part content to play the unedited single, even though edited promos were sent out.
There were 2 versions of the song, the original unedited 5:45 album version, which radio stations were for the most part content to play and the edited DJ version, which only runs for 3:13.
This was written on Paul McCartney’s farm in Scotland. Most of this song was recorded on a motor yacht called the Fair Carol in the Virgin Islands along with several other tracks on London Town. The yacht had a mobile 24-track recording studio installed on it, and when they weren’t recording McCartney, his family and the band lived on three other yachts. The song was then finished off back in London.

Thinking of the water bound sessions, they planned to call the album “Water Wings.”

The lyrics do not convey a political or social message, but McCartney has no problem with Silly Love Songs.

With A Little Luck

With a little luck we can help it out
We can make this whole damn thing work out
With a little love we can lay it down
Can’t you feel the town exploding

There is no end to what we can do together
There is no end
The willow turns his back on inclement weather
And if he can do it we can do it

Just me and you
And a little luck we can clear it up
We can bring it in for a landing
With a little luck we can turn it on
There can be no misunderstanding

There is no end to what we can do together
There is no end
The willow turns his back on inclement weather
And if he can do it

Just me and you
With a little push we could set it off
We can send it rocketing skywards
With a little love we could shake it up
Don’t you feel the comet exploding

With a little luck, with a little luck
With a little luck, a little luck, a little luck

With a little love, we can lay it down
Can’t you feel the town exploding
With a little push, we could set it off
We could send it rocketing skywards

With a little love, we could shake it up
Don’t you feel the comet exploding forwardsWriter/s: PAUL MCCARTNEY
P

Meat Loaf – Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…A song that includes a number.

From his 1977 album, Bat Out Of Hell. The song reached #11 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on August 7, 1978.

From Songfacts

“Two out of three ain’t bad” is a trite cliché often used for comic effect. (“How was your date?” “He was tall, handsome, and incredibly boring.” “Well, two out of three ain’t bad.)

Jim Steinman, who was Meat Loaf’s songwriter, turned the saying into a song about the elusive nature of love. The song begins with Meat Loaf getting kicked to the curb by his girl, presumably because he won’t tell her he loves her. He makes the case that even though he will never love her, he’s good enough, since after all he does want her and need her, and happy endings are only for fairy tales.

We then learn that his commitment issues step from a previous relationship – one with the only woman he will ever love. She once left him with the same explanation: I want you, I need you, but I’ll never love you.

Jim Steinman wrote this song after his friend, the actress Mimi Kennedy, suggested that he write a ballad along the lines of the Elvis Presley song “I Want You, I Need You, I Love You.” She was implying that he should write something straightforward and simple, but Steinman doesn’t work that way. He used the phrase, but added a degree of Shakespearean drama that was typical of his work.

In America, this was the second single released from the Bat Out Of Hell album. The first single, “You Took the Words Right Out of My Mouth,” didn’t chart, but by the time “Two Out of Three” was issued in March 1978, the album was picking up steam and the song rose up the charts, peaking at #11 on July 8.

The single was edited down to 3:58 from the 5:23 album version.

Todd Rundgren produced the Bat Out Of Hell album. On this song, he used the other three members of his band Utopia: Kasim Sulton on bass, Willie Wilcox on drums, and Roger Powell on synthesizer. Rundgren played guitar and also sang backup on this one.
This song got a big boost when Meat Loaf performed it on Saturday Night Live on March 25, 1978.

Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad

Baby we can talk all night
But that ain’t getting us nowhere
I told you everything I possibly can
There’s nothing left inside of here

And maybe you can cry all night
But that’ll never change the way that I feel
The snow is really piling up outside
I wish you wouldn’t make me leave here

I poured it on and I poured it out
I tried to show you just how much I care
I’m tired of words and I’m too hoarse to shout
But you’ve been cold to me so long
I’m crying icicles instead of tears

And all I can do is keep on telling you
I want you
I need you
But there ain’t no way
I’m ever gonna love you
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad

You’ll never find your gold on a sandy beach
You’ll never drill for oil on a city street
I know you’re looking for a ruby
In a mountain of rocks
But there ain’t no Coupe de Ville hiding
At the bottom of a Cracker Jack box

I can’t lie
I can’t tell you that I’m something I’m not
No matter how I try
I’ll never be able to give you something
Something that I just haven’t got

There’s only one girl that I have ever loved
And that was so many years ago
And though I know I’ll never get her out of my heart
She never loved me back, ooh I know
I remember how she left me on a stormy night
She kissed me and got out of our bed
And though I pleaded and I begged her
Not to walk out that door
She packed her bags and turned right away

And she kept on telling me
She kept on telling me
She kept on telling me
I want you
I need you
But there ain’t no way
I’m ever gonna love you
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad
I want you
I need you
But there ain’t no way I’m ever gonna love you
Now don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad
Don’t be sad
‘Cause two out of three ain’t bad

Baby we can talk all night
But that ain’t getting us nowhere

Writer/s: JIM STEINMAN

Smokie – Mexican Girl

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Burrito/Fajita/Mexican/Tequila

From their 1978 album, The Montreux Album. The song reached #19 on UK’s singles chart.

Mexican Girl

Juanita came to me last night and she cried over and over
Ooh, Daddy I love you you know and I think it’s the moonlight
She looked so fine, well she looked alright and she moaned
Ooh, Daddy move over
Oh, baby you know what I like and I think it’s the moonlight
Made in Mexico, schooled in France ooh la lovin’
She needed no teachin’
Oh man, I can say international ways, I believe in
Mexican girl, don’t leave me alone
I got a heart as big as a stone and I need you, believe me
To be here and love me tonight
Mexican girl, I want you to stay, you know my heart is
Longing to say that as long as I live I will always
Remember the one that I called my Mexican girl
Her skin was soft as the velvet sky
And her hair it shone in the moonlight
As the music did play well the night turned to day
And I held her tight
Then she looked at me with her dark brown eyes and she
Whispered, “Hasta La Vista!”
I don’t know what it means but it sounded so good so
I kissed her
Mexican girl, don’t leave me alone
I got a heart as big as a stone and I need you, believe me
To be here and love me tonight
Mexican girl I want you to stay, you know my heart is
Longing to say that as long as I live I will always
Remember the one that I called my
Mexican girl, don’t leave me alone
I got a heart as big as a stone and I need you, believe me
To be here and love me tonight
Mexican girl I want you to stay, you know my heart is
Longing to say that as long as I live I will always
Remember the one that I called
My Mexican girl
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Alan Silson / Christopher Ward Norman / Peter David Spencer / Terence David Littley

Chicago -Baby, What a Big Surprise

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Birthday/Cake/Gift/Party/Surprise.

From their 1977 album, Chicago XI. The song peaked at #4 on Billboard’s HOT 100 chart on December 2, 1977.

Baby, What a Big Surprise

Right before my very eyes
I thought that you were only fakin’ it
And like before my heart was takin’ it
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Yesterday it seemed to me
My life was nothing more than wasted time
But here today you’ve softly changed my mind
Baby, what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes, oh, oh
Oh, woah, oh, oh
Just to be alone
Was a little more than I could take
Then you came to stay, oh
Hold me in the morning
Love me in the afternoon
Help me find my way, hey yeah
Now and then just like before
I think about the love I’ve thrown away
But now it doesn’t matter anyway
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Right before my very eyes
Oh, oh, oh, woah, oh
Baby what a big surprise
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Peter P. Cetera

AC/DC – Touch Too Much

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Touch/Feel.

From their 1979 album, Highway To Hell. The song reached #29 on the UK’s singles chart in 1980. It did not chart in America.

From Songfacts

This is about the dangers of excess, which the band was quite familiar with. They were notorious for their wild parties, girls, and drinking. Lead singer Bon Scott drank himself to death six months after this was released.
Released as a single, this became just the second AC/DC song to chart in the UK, following “Rock ‘N’ Roll Damnation,” which made #24.
Bon Scott’s last performance was when he lip-synched this song when the band performed it on Top of the Pops, a popular British music show. The show aired February 7, 1980; Scott died 12 days later.
Considering how many of their songs are about drinking, it is surprising that AC/DC guitarist Angus Young didn’t touch the stuff. When he was young, a bad encounter with Bond 7 Australian whiskey turned him off from alcohol.

 

Touch Too Much

It was one of those nights
When you turned out the lights
And everything comes into view
She was taking her time
I was losing my mind
There was nothing that she wouldn’t do
It wasn’t the first
It wasn’t the last
She knew we was making love
I was so satisfied
Deep down inside
Like a hand in a velvet glove

Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Too much for my body, too much for my brain
This kind of woman’s gonna drive me insane
She’s got a touch, a touch too much

She had the face of an angel
Smiling with sin
A body of Venus with arms
Dealing with danger
Stroking my skin
Let the thunder and lightening start
It wasn’t the first
It wasn’t the last
It wasn’t that she didn’t care
She wanted it hard
And wanted it fast
She liked it done medium rare

Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Too much for my body, too much for my brain
This kind of woman’s gonna drive me insane
She’s got a touch, a touch too much

Seems like a touch, touch too much
You know it’s much too much, much too much
I really want to feel your touch too much
Girl you know you’re getting me much too much
Seems like a touch
Just a dirty little touch
I really need your touch
‘Cause you’re much too much too much

Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Seems like a touch, a touch too much
Too much for my body, too much for my brain
This kind of woman’s gonna drive me insane
She’s got a touch, a touch too much Writer/s: RONALD BELFORD SCOTT, ANGUS MCKINNON YOUNG, MALCOLM MITCHELL YOUNG

Eric Clapton – Promises

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Promise/Vow/Oath.

From his 1978 album, Backless. The song peaked at #9 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on January 19, 1979.

From rbhsjukebox

This song was written by Richard Feldman and Roger Linn. It features a wonderful harmony vocal from long-time Clapton collaborator (and frequent co-writer) Marcy Levy. She is perhaps better known as Marcella Detroit, the name she assumed as half of the short-lived but massively successful duo Shakespears Sister. Clapton’s vocal is nicely delivered, with just the right bitterness for the lyrics, and Levy’s accompaniment bolsters it perfectly.

Ironically titled, Promises is about broken oaths and the end of a relationship. It’s well-constructed, a perfect three-minute pop song, handled smoothly by a seasoned performer and his sympathetic band.

One other note, Roger Linn invented the first drum machine.

Promises

I don’t care if you never come home
I don’t mind if you just keep on rowin’ away on a distant sea
‘Cause I don’t love you and you don’t love me
You cause a commotion when you come to town
You give ’em a smile and they melt
And your lovers and friends is all good and fine
But I don’t like yours and you don’t like mine
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
I don’t care what you do at night
Oh, I don’t care how you get you delites
We’ll leave it alone and just let it be
I don’t love you and you don’t love me
I got a problem, can you relate
I got a woman callin’ love hate
We made a vow we’d always be friends
How could we know that promises end
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
I tried to love for years upon years
You refuse to take me for real
It’s time you saw what I want you to see
I’d still love you if you’d just love me
I got a problem, can you relate
I got a woman callin’ love hate
We made a vow we’d always be friends
How could we know that promises end
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Wohoo, la la la la la la la