Peter Frampton – Baby, I Love Your Way

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Babe/Cutie/Doll/Honey/Sweetie.

From his 1976 album, Frampton Comes Alive. The song reached #12 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on August 27, 1976.

From Songfacts

This is a very romantic love ballad. Frampton is telling his girl that he loves everything about her and wants to be with her day and night.
This went nowhere when Frampton first released it as a single in 1975. The next year, he included it on his live album, Frampton Comes Alive, and it helped the album become a huge hit. The live version was the second single released from the album, after “Show Me The Way” and before “Do You Feel Like We Do.”
Lisa Bonet sings this in the 2000 movie High Fidelity. John Cusack’s character hates the song until he hears her sing it.

Baby, I Love Your Way

Shadows grow so long before my eyes
And they’re moving across the page
Suddenly the day turns into night
Far away from the city but don’t hesitate
‘Cause your love won’t wait hey
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way every day
Want to be with you night and day

Moon appears to shine and light the sky
With the help of some fireflies
I wonder how they have the power shine shine shine
I can see them under the pines
But don’t hesitate ’cause your love won’t wait hey
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way every day
Want to be with you night and day uh yeah

But don’t hesitate ’cause your love won’t wait
I can see the sunset in your eyes
Brown and grey and blue besides
Clouds are stalking islands in the sun
Wish I could dry one out of season
But don’t hesitate ’cause your love won’t wait hey
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way uuhh
Want to be with you night and day
Ooh baby I love your way every day
Want to tell you I love your way uuhh
Want to be with you night and day

Writer/s: Peter Kenneth Frampton

 

Chris Norman & Suzi Quatro – Stumblin’ In

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Duets.

The song was released as a single in January 1979. The song peaked at #4 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on May 11, 1979.

From Songfacts

This song, which Quatro performed as a duet with Chris Norman, the frontman for Smokie, was a departure from her hard rock sound, as the pair sing about stumbling into love with someone they never expected to be with. This song turned out to be by far the biggest American hit for both performers. >>
This was written and produced by the team of Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn, who were responsible for the lion’s share of hits for both Smokie and Suzi Quatro. Smokie had cut ties with the team, but in 1978 Chapman was producing Quatro’s album If You Knew Suzi, which they were recording in Cologne, Germany. In a spell of serendipity, Smokie received an award in nearby Dusseldorf at this time, and after the ceremony, Quatro and Chapman joined them at a party where music broke out. Chapman sang a medley of the hits he wrote with Chinn, and later, Quatro took the stage with Chris Norman. As Quatro played bass, Norman put his arm around her, and Chapman got an idea.

The next day when he was working with Quatro, he came up with the line “our love is alive” and started hashing out the song “Stumblin’ In,” which he pitched to Quatro as a duet with Norman. She loved the idea.

Chapman finished writing the song with Chinn, and the duet was included on Quatro’s

album.
Quatro’s biggest cultural impact in America was her role as Leather Tuscadero on the TV show Happy Days from 1977-1979.

Stumblin’ In

Our love is alive, and so we begin
Foolishly laying our hearts on the table
Stumblin’ in

Our love is a flame, burning within
Now and then firelight will catch us
Stumblin’ in

Wherever you go, whatever you do
You know these reckless thoughts of mine are following you
I’ve fallen for you, whatever you do
‘Cause, baby, you’ve shown me so many things that I never knew
Whatever it takes, baby, I’ll do it for you

Our love is alive, and so we begin
Foolishly laying our hearts on the table
Stumblin’ in

Our love is a flame, burning within
Now and then firelight will catch us
Stumblin’ in

You were so young, ah, and I was so free
I may have been young, but, baby, that’s not what I wanted to be
Well, you were the one
Oh, why was it me?
‘Cause, baby, you show me so many things that I never see
Whatever you need, baby, you’ve got it from me

Our love is alive, and so we begin
Foolishly laying our hearts on the table
Stumblin’ in

Our love is a flame, burning within
Now and then firelight will catch us
Stumblin’ in

Stumblin’ in, stumblin’ in
Foolishly laying our hearts on the table
Stumblin’ in

Ah, stumblin’ in, mmmh, stumblin’ in
Now and then firelight will catch us
Stumblin’ in

Oh, stumblin’ in, ah, I was stumblin’ in
Foolishly laying our hearts on the table
Stumblin’ in

Oh, stumblin’ in
Ah, stumblin’ in
I was stumblin’ in
We were stumblin’ in Writer/s: MICHAEL DONALD CHAPMAN, NICHOLAS BARRY CHINN

Rolling Stones – Crazy Mama

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Crazy.

From their 1976 album, Black and Blue. The song did not chart but it’s still a great deep cut.

Crazy Mama

Well you’re crazy Mama
With your ball and chain
And your sawn off shotgun
Blown out brains, yeah
You can scandalize me
Scorn my name
You can steal my money
And that don’t mean a doggone thing
Cause if you really think you can push it
I’m going to bust your knees with a bullet
Your crazy mama, ah yeah
Well your old time religion
Is just a superstition
You going to pay high prices
For your sacrificises
Well your blood and thunder
Sure can’t faze me none
If your going to keep on coming
I’m gonna take it all head on
If you don’t believe I’m going to do it
Just wait till you get hit by that bullet
Don’t think I ain’t thought about it
But it sure makes my shackles rise
And cold blood murder
Make me want to draw the line
Well your crazy mama
With your ball and chain
Plain psychotic
Plain insane
If you don’t think I’m gonna do it
Just wait for the thud of the bullet
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Mick Jagger / Keith Richards

Donny Hathaway – This Christmas

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt… Christmas/Holiday/Snowman

The song was released as a single on December 9, 1970.  The song had reached #38 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on December 13, 2019. This is the very first time the original version has been on the Hot 100 chart.

From Songfacts

Hathaway wrote this soulful Christmas song with Nadine McKinnor. It evokes the spirit of the holiday, as he’s looking forward to spending the season with friends and family. In the memorable chorus, he sings:

And this Christmas, will be
A very special Christmas, for me
Like many Christmas songs, this one took a while to find an audience. Released as a single in 1970, it went nowhere, but later became a modern holiday standard, covered by a wide range of artists including Destiny’s Child, Aretha Franklin and Lady Antebellum. Chris Brown.

This Christmas

Hang all the mistletoe
I’m gonna get to know you better
This Christmas
And as we trim the tree
How much fun it’s gonna be together
This Christmas
Fireside’s blazing bright
We’re caroling through the night
And this Christmas will be
A very special Christmas for me
Presents and cards are here
My world is filled with cheer, and you
This Christmas
And as I look around
Your eyes outshine the town, they do
This Christmas
Fireside’s blazing bright
We’re caroling through the night
And this Christmas will be
A very special Christmas for me, Yeah
Shake a hand, shake a hand now
Fireside’s blazing bright
We’re caroling through the night
And this Christmas will be
A very special Christmas for me
Merry Christmas
Shake a hand, shake a hand now
Wish your brother Merry Christmas
All over the land now
Yeahhh
Merry Christmas
Merry, Merry Christmas
Yeahhh
Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: HATHAWAY DONNY E / MC KINNOR NADINE

Rod Stewart – Hot Legs

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Arms/Elbows/Knees/Legs.

From his 1977 album, Foot Loose & Fancy Free. The song reached #28 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on May 1, 1978. It has been rumored that the legs in the video belong to actress Jenilee Harrison who played Cindy on the TV show Three’s Company.

From Songfacts

Stewart refers to this rocker as one of his “dirty, rude, shagging songs.” It tells the story of a young lady who won’t leave him alone, wearing him out when she comes by for some lovin’ at all hours. We never learn her name and get the sense that he doesn’t know it – he just calls her “hot legs.”

Many found it objectionable, but it was a believable storyline from Stewart, who was very popular with the ladies. At the time, he was involved with the actress Britt Ekland; he would later marry Alana Hamilton, Rachel Hunter and Penny Lancaster.

Stewart is the sole songwriter on this track. It’s reminiscent of a song he released with his group Faces in 1971 called “Stay With Me,” where he beds a girl but makes sure she’s gone by morning. In “Hot Legs,” he repeats this request:

You can love me tonight if you want
But in the morning make sure you’re gone

Vanilla Fudge drummer Carmine Appice was a recent addition to Stewart’s band and played on this track. Other personell included Billy Peek, Jim Cregan and Gary Grainger on guitars, Phil Kenzie on saxophone, Phil Chen on bass and John Jarvis on organ.

The music video, directed by Bruce Gowers, doubled down on the objectification angle, with most shot framed between the legs of a woman we never see from the front (skinny legs – easier for framing but also the popular look at the time). Shot in the dusty town of Piru, California (outside of Los Angeles), the clip shows Stewart and his band performing the song, hanging out with locals, and riding recklessly on top of a truck – boys will be boys.

This was four years before MTV, but Stewart made videos for most of his singles because there were many outlets in Europe that showed them.

Hot Legs

Who’s that knockin’ on my door?
It’s gotta be a quarter to four
Is it you again, comin’ round for more?
Well, you can love me tonight if you want
But in the morning make sure you’re gone
I’m talkin’ to you
Hot legs, you’re wearin’ me out
Hot legs, you can scream and shout
Hot legs, are you still in school?
I love you honey
You got a most persuasive tongue
You promise all kinds of fun
But what you don’t understand, I’m a working man
I’m gonna need a shot of vitamin E
By the time you’re finished with me
I’m talkin’ to you
Hot legs, you’re an alley cat
Hot legs, you scratch my back
Hot legs, bring your mother too
I love you, honey
Imagine how my daddy felt
In your jet black suspender belt
Seventeen years old,
He’s trudging sixty four
You got legs right up to your neck
You’re makin’ me a physical wreck
I’m talkin’ to you
Hot legs in your satin shoes
Hot legs, are you still in school?
Hot legs, you’re makin’ me a fool
I love you, honey
Hot legs, you’re makin’ your mark
Hot legs, keep my pencil sharp
Hot legs, keep your hands to yourself
I love you, honey
Hot legs you’re wearin’ me out
Hot legs you can scream and shout
Hot legs, you’re still in school
I love you, honey
Hot legs
Hot legs
Hot legs
Hot legs you’re well-equipped
Hot legs oh your pussy’s whipped
Hot legs I just love your lips
I love ya
I love ya
I love ya, honey
Hot legs
Hot legs
Hot legs
I love ya honey!
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Rod Stewart

The Who – Behind Blue Eyes

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Chin/Ears/Eyes/Face/Mouth/Nose.

From their 1971 album, Who’s Next. The song reached #34 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on December 18, 1971.

From Songfacts

Pete Townshend originally wrote this about a character in his “Lifehouse” project, which was going to be a film similar to The Who’s Tommy and Quadrophenia. Townshend never finished “Lifehouse,” but the songs ended up on the album Who’s Next.
Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey both have blue eyes, but the song is not autobiographical. Townshend has said that he wrote it to show “How lonely it is to be powerful.”
Townshend was going to use this as the main song in the Lifehouse film for the villain, Jumbo.
Pete Townshend has explained that he never behaved like a typical rock star when he was on tour, especially when it came to groupies, which he tried to avoid. He says it was a run-in with a groupie that was the impetus for this song. Townshend, who got married in 1968, was tempted by a groupie after The Who’s June 9, 1970 concert in Denver. He says that he went back to his room alone and wrote a prayer beginning, “If my fist clenches, crack it open…” The prayer was more or less asking for help in resisting this temptation. The other words could be describing Townshend’s self-pity and how hard it is to resist.
Roger Daltrey’s dog got run over on the day he recorded his vocals for this song – it was the first dog he ever had. The Who singer recalled to AARP The Magazine that he “was desperately trying to hold it together.”

Behind Blue Eyes

No one knows what it’s like
To be the bad man
To be the sad man
Behind blue eyes

No one knows what it’s like
To be hated
To be fated
To telling only lies

But my dreams
They aren’t as empty
As my conscience seems to be

I have hours, only lonely
My love is vengeance
That’s never free

No one knows what it’s like
To feel these feelings
Like I do
And I blame you

No one bites back as hard
On their anger
None of my pain and woe
Can show through

But my dreams
They aren’t as empty
As my conscience seems to be

I have hours, only lonely
My love is vengeance
That’s never free

When my fist clenches, crack it open
Before I use it and lose my cool
When I smile, tell me some bad news
Before I laugh and act like a fool

And if I swallow anything evil
Put your finger down my throat
And if I shiver, please give me a blanket
Keep me warm, let me wear your coat

No one knows what it’s like
To be the bad man
To be the sad man
Behind blue eyes

Songwriters: Pete Townshend

Christie – Yellow River

From their 1970 self-titled album, Christie. The song reached #23 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on November 28, 1970.

From dmme.net 2009

– Jeff, there seems to be a resurgence of interest in all things CHRISTIE. Do you have an explanation for this little phenomenon?

Well, it’s the fortieth anniversary of the release of “Yellow River” next April, so this could be something to do with that, or people just wanting to stay in touch with songs they grew up with that made a huge impact on them at the time: nostalgia is a very powerful emotion! Also that particular song means so much to so many people – a simple anti-war song that the listener can instantly connect with, that has a timeless and universal theme, applicable to any zone of war or conflict. Or is it like the old Heineken advert, ‘It reaches the parts other beers can’t!’? Also, with so many famous and not so famous cover versions all over the world, the song sooner or later threads its way back to the composer or group which is me, Christie. So one way or another, that “River” keeps rollin’!

From Wikipedia

The actual location of Yellow River in this song is not specified, although the author, Jeff Christie, is on record as saying that it was inspired by the idea of a soldier going home at the end of the American Civil WarAs the song was released during the Vietnam War, it has been interpreted as being about a soldier leaving the U.S. Military at the end of his period of conscription.

Yellow River

So long boy you can take my place, got my papers I’ve got my pay
So pack my bags and I’ll be on my way to yellow river

Put my guns down the war is won
Fill my glass high the time has come
I’m going back to the place that I love yellow river
Yellow river, yellow river is in my mind and in my eyes
Yellow river, yellow river is in my blood, it’s the place I love
Got no time for explanations, got no time to lose
Tomorrow night you’ll find me
Sleeping underneath the moon at yellow river
Cannon fire lingers in my mind, I’m so glad that I’m still alive
And I’ve been gone for such a long time from yellow river
I remember the nights were cool I can still see the water pool
And I remember the girl that I knew from yellow river
Yellow river, yellow river is in my mind and in my eyes
Yellow river, yellow river is in my blood it’s the place I love
Got no time for explanations, got no time to lose
Tomorrow night you’ll find me
Sleeping underneath the moon at yellow river
Yellow river, yellow river is in my mind and in my eyes
Yellow river, yellow river is in my blood it’s the place I love
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Jeff Christie

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers – Don’t Do Me Like That

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Did/Didn’t/Do/Don’t/Does/Doesn’t.

From his 1979 album, Damn The Torpedoes. The song peaked at #10 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on February 2, 1980.

From Songfacts

Petty wrote this after his first group Mudcrutch moved from Florida to Los Angeles in 1974. The song finds him warning (or at least asking) a girl not to dump him, as he has a friend who recently had his heart broken. Not one of the group’s more meaningful songs, Creem magazine called it a “throwaway romp.”

Many listeners enjoyed this romp, making it one of Petty’s most popular songs.

Tom Petty strongly considered giving the song to The J. Geils Band because he thought it had their sound. (Petty and the Heartbreakers had opened for the J. Geils Band on tour). However, the band turned him down as they were already deep in the mixing process for their album and producer Jimmy Iovine persuaded Petty and his bandmates to record it themselves. They were glad they did as it reached #10 on the Hot 100, becoming the group’s first Top 10 hit.

Don’t Do Me Like That

I was talking with a friend of mine
Said a woman had hurt his pride
Told him that she loved him so
And turned around and let him go
Then he said, you better watch your step
Or your gonna get hurt yourself
Someone’s gonna tell you lies
Cut you down to size

Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
What if I love you baby?
Don’t do me like that

Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
Someday I might need you baby
Don’t do me like that

Listen honey, can you see?
Baby, you would bury me
If you were in the public eye
Givin’ someone else a try
And you know you better watch your step
Or you’re gonna get hurt yourself
Someone’s gonna tell you lies
Cut you down to size

Don ‘t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
What if I love you baby?
Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t

Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
What if I need you baby?
Don’t do me like that

‘Cause somewhere deep down inside
Someone is saying, Love doesn’t last that long
I got this feelin’ inside night and day
And now I can’t take it no more

Listen honey, can you see?
Baby, you would bury me
If you were in the public eye
Givin’ someone else a try
And you know you better watch your step
Or you’re gonna get hurt yourself
Someone’s gonna tell you lies
Cut you down to size

Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
What if I love you baby?
Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t

Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
I just might need you honey
Don’t do me like that

Wait
Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
Baby, baby, baby
Don’t, don’t, don’t

No
Don’t do me like that
Don’t do me like that
Baby, baby, baby

Oh, oh, ohWriter/s: TOM PETTY
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

The Who – Don’t Let Go The Coat

From their 1981 album, Face Dances. The song reached #84 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on July 11, 1981. I was inspired by today’s weather. It is 15 degrees here right now.

From Wikipedia

Several authors, including Stephen Thomas Erlewine, regard the lyrics of “Don’t Let Go the Coat” as an ode to spiritual guru Meher Baba. The title then refers to Meher Baba’s charge that his disciples “hang fast to the hem of my robe,” where the robe is a metaphor for his teachings. Alternatively, the song could refer to Pete Townshend‘s parents, who were the ones who would pick him up when Pete Townshend descended into drugs and alcohol.[1] But regardless, the song strikes themes of spiritual torment, fear of abandonment and the need to keep faith, beginning with the lines:

“I can’t be held responsible for blown behavior

I’ve lost all contact with my only saviour”

Musically, “Don’t Let Go the Coat” has a country rock flavor. Authors Steve Grantley and Alan Parker describe the guitar sound as being similar to that of The Pretenders, and note that the Pete Townshend‘s acoustic guitar solo has Spanish inflections.

Don’t Let Go The Coat

I lost all contact with my only saviour
No-one locked me out because I failed to phone up
I can’t bear to live forever like a loner

Don’t let go the coat

It’s easy to be sad: when you lack a partner
But how would I react to a broken heart now
It ain’t really true rock and roll unless I’m
Hanging onto you and when I hold it next time

I won’t let go the coat

I try to explain but you never understand it
I need your body but I can’t just demand it
I won’t let go like a stray at heel
(Never let it out of your sight)
Every lonely wife knows the way I feel
(Don’t let go tonight)
Don’t let go the coat
Never let go the coat

Your friends all pass for life is just a market
But you have to finish everything you started
So I live my life tearing down the runway
Sure to get the hang of hanging in there someday

Don’t let go the coat
Won’t get no more chances – forget the war dances
Go blind and hang on – don’t try the slang son
Never let go the coat.

Songwriters: Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend

Smokie – Living Next Door to Alice

Released as a single in 1976.  The song reached #25 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on February 26, 1977, and #5 on the UK singles chart.

From Songfacts & Wikipedia

This overtly commercial song was a massive hit, but someone had to spoil it. Written by the regular team of Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn, the men who wrote hits for Suzie Quatro, Sweet and (the one they don’t talk about) Gary Glitter, this was recorded initially by New World in 1972.

In November 1976, it was released by Smokie, a group Chapman and Chinn were producing, for whom it was a massive hit, topping the charts in no fewer than seven countries. Curiously this was a double A-side, the other side being “Night Moves” by Bob Seger. Unfortunately, someone thought it was fit to parody, and in 1995, the Dutch project Gompie decided to add an unfortunate refrain to it: “Alice, Alice, who the f–k is Alice?” This version topped the Netherlands chart.

In this song, the singer is heartbroken because Alice, his neighbor for 24 years, is moving away. He never expressed his feelings for her, but he clearly thought about her a lot. In the last verse, his other neighbor, Sally, says that she’s been waiting 24 years for him, and she’s still here, but he ignores her and continues to pine for Alice.
On the American Top 40 broadcast of 26 May 1979, Casey Kasem reported that Chapman stated that his source of inspiration for “Living Next Door to Alice” was “Sylvia’s Mother” by Dr. Hook.

Living Next Door to Alice

Sally called, when she got the word
She said “I suppose you’ve heard about Alice”
Well, I rushed to the window, and I looked outside
And I could hardly believe my eyes
This big limousine pulled slowly into Alice’s drive
Oh, I don’t know why she’s leaving, or where she’s gonna go
I guess she’s got her reasons but I just don’t want to know
‘Cause for twenty four years I’ve been living next door to Alice
Twenty four years, just waitin’ for a chance
To tell her how I’m feeling, maybe get a second glance
Now I’ve gotta get used to not living next door to Alice
Grew up together, two kids in the park
Carved our initials deep in the bark me and Alice
Now she walks to the door, with her head held high
Just for a moment, I caught her eye
As the big limousine pulled slowly out of Alice’s drive
Oh, I don’t know why she’s leaving, or where she’s gonna go
I guess she’s got her reasons but I just don’t want to know
‘Cause for twenty four years I’ve been living next door to Alice
Twenty four years, just waitin’ for a chance
To tell her how I’m feeling, maybe get a second glance
Now I’ve gotta get used to not living next door to Alice
Sally called back, and asked how I felt
She said “I know how to help, you get over Alice”
She said “Now Alice is gone, but I’m still here
You know I’ve been waiting twenty four years”
And the big limousine disappeared
I don’t know why she’s leaving, or where she’s gonna go
I guess she’s got her reasons but I just don’t want to know
‘Cause for twenty four years I’ve been living next door to Alice
Twenty four years, just waitin’ for a chance
To tell her how I’m feeling, maybe get a second glance
Now I’ll never get used to not living next door to Alice
No, I’ll never get used to not living next door to Alice
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Michael Donald Chapman / Nicholas Barry Chinn