Counting Crows – A Long December

From their 1996 album, Recovering The Satellites. The song peaked at #5 on the US Hot Modern Rock Tracks chart and #1 on the Canadian RPM Top Singles chart… Happy New Year!

From Songfacts

During the taping of a VH1 Storytellers performance, lead singer Adam Duritz talked about the song: “In the middle of December of ’95 my friend Jennifer got run over by a car, just creamed. And I spent that whole month, while we were just beginning the record and most of January and February in the hospital. Each morning and early afternoon then I’d go to the studio, the house where we were recording, and we’d play all afternoon and all night.

It was a very weird time because there is a lot of stress, not that it’s a big deal being a second album, but any album. They’re just not that easy to make. It’s a very stressful process, especially when you’re first starting out. I spent a lot of time in the hospital which is pretty weird. But one day I just left the studio about 2 in the morning, and I went to my friend Samantha and Tracy’s house which is Hillside Manor, that’s what we call it anyway, it’s just a little house and I sat there talking with them. I woke them up, got them out of bed and made them talk to me for a couple hours, then I went home to my house. I wrote this song between about 4 and 6 and then went to the hospital the next day, and came to the house and I played it for the guys before dinner and taught it to them after dinner.

We played it about six or seven times. It was take number six. We just stopped, that was it. We recorded the song, it was done. We all went into the kitchen and had a cold beer, I grabbed Brad our engineer and ran back out about five minutes later, had him play the tape three times, just recorded all the harmonies, and we’ve never touched it since, that was it. It’s a completely live song except for the harmonies.

It’s a song about looking back on your life and seeing changes happening, and for once for me, looking forward and thinking, ya know, things are gonna change for the better – ‘maybe this year will be better than the last.’ And so, like a lot of songs on the end of an album it’s not about everything turning out great, but it at least it is about hope… and the possibilities.”

Courteney Cox, who was starring in Friends at the time, is the girl in the video (not her first – she was in Bruce Springsteen’s video for “Dancing In The Dark” and Toad the Wet Sprocket’s “Good Intentions”). She and Adam Duritz met on the set and dated for a while. Duritz, dated Cox’ Friends co-star Jennifer Aniston in 1995.
Lawrence Carroll directed the video, which finds Duritz playing a grand piano in the woods and does some serious longing. Carroll used many of the same elements – words scrawled on walls, cutaways to pretty girl looking plaintive – in the Collective Soul video for “Precious Declaration.”

A Long December

A long December and there’s reason to believe
Maybe this year will be better than the last
I can’t remember the last thing that you said as you were leavin’
Now the days go by so fast

And it’s one more day up in the canyons
And it’s one more night in Hollywood
If you think that I could be forgiven I wish you would

The smell of hospitals in winter
And the feeling that it’s all a lot of oysters, but no pearls
All at once you look across a crowded room
To see the way that light attaches to a girl

And it’s one more day up in the canyons
And it’s one more night in Hollywood
If you think you might come to California I think you should

Drove up to Hillside Manor sometime after two a.m.
And talked a little while about the year
I guess the winter makes you laugh a little slower,
Makes you talk a little lower about the things you could not show her

And it’s been a long December and there’s reason to believe
Maybe this year will be better than the last
I can’t remember all the times I tried to tell my myself
To hold on to these moments as they pass

And it’s one more day up in the canyon
And it’s one more night in Hollywood
It’s been so long since I’ve seen the ocean I guess I should

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah Writer/s: ADAM FREDRIC DURITZ, BEN G MIZE, CHARLES THOMAS GILLINGHAM, DANIEL JOHN VICKREY, DAVID LYNN BRYSON, MATTHEW MARK MALLEY
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group

AC/DC – Witch’s Spell 

From their 2020 album Power Up. The song has not charted…Happy Halloween!

From digitaljournal.com

Iconic rock band AC/DC has cast a rocking “Witch’s Spell” with their new single and music video. Digital Journal has the scoop.

The song is upbeat and infectious, couple with a retro ’80s vibe to it. The music video was directed, edited, and animated by Wolf & Crow and it utilizes performance footage of the group that was shot by Clemens Habicht; moreover, AC/DC and their creative director, Josh Cheuse, have brought this irresistible track to life in a refreshing manner.

Read more: https://www.digitaljournal.com/entertainment/review-ac-dc-casts-rocking-witchs-spell-with-new-single/article#ixzz7AnaHIme9

Witch’s Spell

Let me tell you your fortune
It could be sinister, or maybe not
Like a leopard, can’t change it’s own spotsRide a moon beam
Sail the starlight
My blaze in the night sky
See the witch’s flightCaught in a witch’s spell
Got a tale to tell
Caught in a witch’s spell
Got a tale to tell
Caught in a witch’s spellGood time maker who likes it hot
Like a card playin’ shark who takes the whole lot
(And that’s a lot)Riding moonbeam
Sail the starlight
My blaze in the night sky
See the witch’s flightCaught in a witch’s spell
Got a tale to tell
Caught in a witch’s spell
Got a tale to tell
Caught in a witch’s spellIt’s all coming to ya
It’s all coming through ya
I get bathed in a light
The spell’s just rightCaught in a witch’s spell
Got a tale to tell
Caught in a witch’s spell
Got a tale to tell
Caught in a witch’s spellCrystal balls and an almanac
She gonna take you to hell and back
I’ve got potions, snake oil style
Good luck charms and a witch’s spell Source: Musixmatch Songwriters: Angus Young / Malcolm Young

Southern Culture on the Skids – Banana Puddin

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Apple/Banana/Cherry/Olive/Orange/Strawberry.

From their 1997 album, Plastic Seat Sweet. The song did not chart.

From Wikipedia

Southern Culture on the Skids, also sometimes known as SCOTS, is an American rock band that was formed in 1983 in Chapel HillNorth Carolina. The band consists of Rick Miller, Dave Hartman, and Mary Huff.

Guitarist/singer Rick Miller, drummer Dave Hartman and bassist/singer/heartbreaker Mary Huff, play a greasy mix of surf, rockabilly, R&B and country-fried garage with a side of psych, all the while driving fans into ecstatic, sweat-drenched paroxysms of joy. It’s a musical gumbo Miller calls, “Americana from the wrong side of the tracks.“ The band has been prolific and ubiquitous for over thirty years, touring everywhere from the North Carolina prison system to Mount Fuji, Japan, and delivering what Rolling Stone calls “a hell raising rock and roll party.“

Banana Puddin

Banana puddin’, banana puddin’
Banana puddin’, banana puddin’
Banana puddin’, banana puddin’
Mama’s hard at work back in the kitchen
(Day old banana puddin’)
Daddy’s on the sofa just a-moanin’ and a-bitchin’
(Day old banana puddin’)
I want something good and sweet to eat
(Day old banana puddin’)
Something that’s easy on the gums and teeth
(Day old banana puddin’)

Puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’
Puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’
Ain’t that a slippery groove?

Banana puddin’, banana puddin’
Banana puddin’, banana puddin’

It takes a little time to develop the flavor
(Day old banana puddin’)
To soak it all up with your vanilla wafer
(Day old banana puddin’)
So get out your bowl and your wooden spoon
(Day old banana puddin’)
‘Cause I can smell your pudding clean across this room
(Day old banana puddin’)
Puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’
Puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’ puddin’
Ain’t that a slippery groove?

Aerosmith – The Other Side

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Contrasts

From their 1989 album, Pump. The song reached #22 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on August 17, 1990.

From Wikipedia

The live footage was filmed during part of the band’s swing through the south. Clips from their shows in Tallahassee, Jackson, New Orleans, and Shreveport were used in the video.

Additionally, the song reached #1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, the third single from Pump to do so.

It was used in Tony Scott‘s 1993 film True Romance, with Christian Slater and Dennis Hopper.

The Other Side

Mm, mm, mm, mm, mm, mm
Mm, mm, mm, mm mm, mm, mm mmCome on
Lovin’ you has got to be (Take me to the other side)
Like the devil in the deep blue sea (Take me to the other side)
Forget about your foolish pride (Take me to the other side)
Oh take me to the other side (Take me to the other side)My mama told me there’d be days like this
And man she wasn’t foolin’
‘Cause I just can’t believe the way you kiss
You opened up your mouth with bated breath
You said you’d never leave me
You love me, you hate me, I tried to take the loss
You’re cryin’ me a river but I got to get acrossLovin’ you has got to be (Take me to the other side)
Like the devil in the deep blue sea (Take me to the other side)
Forget about your foolish pride (Take me to the other side)
Oh take me to the other side (Take me to the other side)I’m lookin’ for another kind of love
Oh lordy, how I need it
The kind that likes to leap without a shove
Oh honey, best believe it
To save a lot of time and foolish pride
I’ll say what’s on my mind, girl
You love me, you hate me, you cut me down to size
You blinded me with love and, yeah, it opened up my eyesLovin’ you has got to be (Take me to the other side)
Like the devil and the deep blue sea (Take me to the other side)
My conscience got to be my guide (Take me to the other side)
Oh honey, take me, take me, take, take, take, takeTake me to the other side
I’m lookin’ for another kind of love
Oh, lordy, how I need it
The kind that likes to leap without a shove
Honey, you best believe it
Now I ain’t one for saying long goodbyes
I hope all is forgiven
You loved me, you hate me, I used to be your lover
You know you had it coming, girl
So take me to the other sideLovin’ you has got to be (Take me to the other side)
Like the devil and the deep blue sea (Take me to the other side)
My conscience got to be my guide (Take me to the other side)
Oh honey, take me to the other side (Take me to the other side)Lovin’ you has got to be (Take me to the other side)
Like the devil in the deep blue sea (Take me to the other side)
Forget about your foolish pride (Take me to the other side)
Oh take me to the other side

Source: LyricFindSongwriters: Lamont Dozier / Brian Holland / Edward J Holland / Steven Tyler / James Douglas VallanceDulcimer Stomp / The Other Side lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management

Primal Scream – Movin’ On Up

From their 1991 album, Screamadelica. The song peaked at #2 on Billboard’s Alternative Songs chart on November 22, 1991. One Youtube post said It’s like Amazing Grace meets Sympathy For The Devil.

From Songfacts

This Screamadelica album opener started out like a “slow, gospel kind of ballad, like a Curtis Mayfield-type thing,” frontman Bobby Gillespie told NME. “We couldn’t work out a way of giving it motion or a forward-thrust, so to speak. Then one day (guitarist) Andrew Innes had the idea to do the Bo Diddley-style/Who ‘Magic Bus‘ guitar, very syncopated, and that gave it the forward motion and the rock ‘n roll attitude.”
Gillespie on the simplicity of the lyrics (to NME): “I like country and soul and blues imagery, it’s very simple and direct, and it’s written in a language that anybody can understand. But it’s hard to write that simple because people will always want to complicate things to show of that they can, you know, they think they can write better than they actually can. It’s all about communicating and touching people.”
The lyrics “I was blind, now I can see, you made a believer out of me,” were taken from the German rock band Can’s 1969 song “Yoo Doo Right,” from their debut album, Monster Movie.

Movin’ On Up

I was blind, now I can see
You made a believer out of me
I was blind, now I can see
You made a believer out of me

I’m movin’ on up now
Getting out of the darkness
My light shines on
My light shines on
My light shines on

I was lost
Now I’m found
I believe in you
I got no bounds
I was lost
Now I’m found
I believe in you
I got no bounds

I’m movin’ on up now
Getting out of the darkness
My light shines on
My light shines on
My light shines on (my light shines on)
My light shines on (my light shines on)
My light shines on

(My light shines on)
(My light shines on)
(My light shines on)
(My light shines on)

I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on)
I’m gettin’ out of the darkness (my light shines on) Writer/s: Andrew Innes, Bobby Gillespie, Robert Young

Kenny Wayne Shepherd – Blue on Black

From his 1997 album, Trouble Is… The song reached #78 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on May 8, 1998.

From Songfacts

When you mix blue and black, the black consumes the blue. It’s a powerful metaphor for a one-sided or broken relationship, which seems to be what the song is about, although with lines like “tears on a river, push on a shove” it could also relate to a death or abuse of some kind. In a Songfacts interview with Kenny Wayne Shepherd, he said: “So many people have applied it to a death in the family, an abusive relationship, a broken relationship, or whatever. There are so many different ways. That’s what’s beautiful about music and lyrics is trying to write a song that the listener can apply to their own experience in whatever way seems fit. And that’s one of those songs.”
Shepherd wrote this with the husband-and-wife team of Tia Sillers and Mark Selby, who also composed “There’s Your Trouble” for Dixie Chicks. “We wrote that when we were down in New Orleans,” Shepherd told Songfacts. “I had the music, and Mark and I were just rolling with the music and tried to develop things up. Tia came up with this idea based on a shirt that I was wearing that was blue and black. She noticed the two colors that were dominant on my shirt, and if you mix those two colors together, black consumes the blue. It doesn’t amount to anything if you put the two together: You still have one color, instead of creating a new color.”
With this track, Shepherd became one of the few blues artists to land on the Hot 100. He never returned to that chart, but consistently went to #1 on the Billboard Blues Albums tally.
Jerry Harrison of Talking Heads produced this track and the rest of the Trouble Is… album.

Blue on Black

Night
Falls and I’am alone
Skin
Yeah chilled me to the bone
You
Turned and you ran
Oh yea
Oh slipped
Right from my hand
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
As a dead man’s touch
Whisper on a scream
Doesn’t change a thing
Doesn’t bring you back
Blue on black

Blind
Oh now I see
Truth
Lies and in between
Wrong
Can’t be undone
Slipped
From the tip of your tongue

Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
As a dead man’s touch
Whisper on a scream
Doesn’t change a thing
Doesn’t bring you back
Blue on black

Writer/s: Tia Sillers, Mark Selby, Kenny Shepherd

 

Lisa Loeb & Nine Stories – Stay (I Missed You)

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Come/Go/Leave/Stay

From the 1994 Reality Bites soundtrack and from her 1995 album, Tails. The song peaked at #1 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on August 19, 1994.

From Songfacts

In our interview with Lisa Loeb, she explained: “At the time I was having arguments with my boyfriend, who was actually my co-producer as well – we made records together. And then I go off into some other areas: I remember somebody close to me was going through severe, severe depression. A lot of times in my songs, I get into some phase where I describe some other situation, and there’s a whole verse in there about somebody who is very, very depressed. But yeah, it was a story about a breakup I was going through, and that situation where it’s gotten into your head too much. Partially because somebody else is telling you that you’re only hearing what you want to, and that puts you in a little bit of a tailspin. It puts me in a little bit of a tailspin, because you can’t figure out what’s actually real, are you only seeing things through your own eyes? Are you actually seeing things the way that they really are, or are you making things up? And at what point do you know whether you’re seeing things the way that they really are?”
This was used in the movie Reality Bites. Loeb’s friend, Ethan Hawke, brought it to the attention of Ben Stiller, who saw Loeb perform and used her song in his movie. It was a huge break for Loeb, who did not have a record deal at the time. When she found out the song was going on the soundtrack, she knew it was the end of her temp work – she had a gig with the consulting firm Ernst & Young at the time).
Long before this song became a hit, Loeb performed it at her shows, where it got a great response and was one of her most requested songs. Says Loeb: “I usually write songs that are more fictional, and for some reason when I sat down to write that song, I let myself write more about how I was feeling at that moment. And that’s something I think about a lot as I continue to write music, that the songs that I write that are more personal and without as much editing, are the ones that people connect to more.”

Stay (I Missed You)

You say I only hear what I want to
You say I talk so all the time so.

And I thought what I felt was simple,
And I thought that I don’t belong,
And now that I am leaving,
Now I know that I did something wrong ’cause I missed you.
Yeah, I missed you.

And you say I only hear what I want to:
I don’t listen hard,
I don’t pay attention to the distance that you’re running
Or to anyone, anywhere,
I don’t understand if you really care,
I’m only hearing negative: no, no, no (bad)

And so I, I turned the radio on, I turned the radio up
And this woman was singin’ my song:
The lover’s in love and the other’s run away,
The lover is cryin’ ’cause the other won’t stay.

Some of us hover when we weep for the other who was
Dying since the day they were born.
Well, this is not that:
I think that I’m throwing, but I’m thrown.

And I thought I’d live forever, but now I’m not so sure.

You try to tell me that I’m clever,
But that won’t take my anyhow, or anywhere with you.

You said that I was naive,
And I thought that I was strong.
I thought, “hey, I can leave, I can leave.”
Oh but now I know that I was wrong, ’cause I missed you.

You said, “I caught you ’cause I want you and one day I’ll let you go.”
You try to give away a keeper, or keep me ’cause you know you’re just so scared to lose.
And you say, “Stay.”

You say I only hear what I want to.

Writer/s: Lisa A. Loeb

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers – Swingin

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Tom/Dick/Harry

From their 1999 album, Echo. The song reached #17 on Billboards Mainstream Rock Songs chart on September 17, 1999.

Swingin
Well, she was standing by the highway
In her boots and silver spurs
Gonna hitchhike to the yellow moon
When a Cadillac stopped for her
And she said, “Hey, nice to meet you, are you goin’ my way?”
Yeah, that’s when it happened
The world caught fire that day

And she went down swingin’
Yeah, she went down swingin’

Well, she was over twenty-one
In trouble with the law
And it didn’t faze her none
She called her mother-in-law
And said I need a little money
I knew I could count on you
After that night in Vegas
And the hell that we went through

We went down swingin’
Like Benny Goodman
Yeah, we went down swingin’

Moonlight on the interstate
She was ‘cross the Georgia line
Looked out the window feeling great
Yeah, it had to come in time
And she said I’m never goin’ back
She said at last I’m free
I wish ma could see me now, she’d be so proud of me

She went down swingin’
Like Glenn Miller
Yeah, she went down swingin’
Like Tommy Dorsey
Yeah, she went down swingin’
Like Sammy Davis
She went down swingin’
Like Sonny Liston

Temple Of The Dog – Hunger Strike

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Bounty/Dessert/Eat/Feast/Food/Hungry/Turkey

From their 1991 self-titled album. The song peaked at #4 on Billboards Mainstream Rock chart on September 5, 1992.

From Songfacts

Temple of the Dog began when Chris Cornell of Soundgarden wrote two songs in honor of his good friend Andrew Wood, who died of a heroin overdose in March 1990. Wood was kept on life support for three days after he overdosed, during which time Cornell and his band mates came to see him. Wood was in a promising Seattle band called Mother Love Bone with Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament, who were forming their new band that would become Pearl Jam. Cornell teamed up with them and guitarist Mike McCready with the intention of recording some of Wood’s solo songs along with Cornell’s two tribute tracks. Responding to concerns that they were somehow exploiting Wood’s work, the guys decided to release an album of all original material in tribute to Wood, and called the band Temple of the Dog after a Mother Love Bone lyric from their song “Man of Golden Words.”

“Hunger Strike” was the last song recorded for the album; Chris Cornell wrote it because they had only nine tracks and he has a compulsive distaste for odd numbers. Describing the song in the Pearl Jam Twenty collection, he said, “I was wanting to express the gratitude for my life but also disdain for people where that’s not enough, where they want more. There’s no way to really have a whole lot more than you need usually without taking from somebody else that can’t really afford to give it to you. It’s sort of about taking advantage of a person or people who really don’t have anything.”

The same verse is repeated twice in this song, as Cornell felt he had said everything he could on the subject with those words. Once these verse lyrics are out of the way, it’s all chorus and bridge, which works thanks to the second vocalist on the song: Eddie Vedder.

Temple of the Dog recorded the song on the very day Vedder flew in from San Diego to meet with his new bandmates in what would become Pearl Jam: October 8, 1990. It was the first time he met any of the guys, and for most of the sessions, he kept to himself (Vedder was chosen based on a tape he sent to the guys where he added vocals to some of their tracks). Chris Cornell planned to sing both the high and low parts of the “Going Hungry” chorus by himself with the help of overdubs, but he was struggling with the low register. In a defining moment, Vedder stepped up to the microphone and sang the low parts of the chorus, which made the song click for Cornell.

With two distinct voices, Cornell could now sing the verse lyrics at the beginning of the song, and Vedder could follow with the same lyrics, giving it a different sound. With both voices on the chorus, the song really came together and became the highlight of the album. It was a huge moment for Eddie, as he interjected himself into Cornell’s song without coming off as arrogant, and gained the respect of his new bandmates in the process. It was Vedder’s first recorded vocal for a major record, and it proved to those in the room that he understood their sound and was willing to contribute any way he could, even if it wasn’t for his band.

The video for the song was shot in Discovery Park in Seattle. The western view at sunset with band members’ backs to the camera facing Bainbridge Island, home of Andrew Wood, was a symbolic goodbye to their friend.

Hunger Strike

Well I don’t mind stealing bread
From the mouths of decadence
But I can’t feed on the powerless
When my cup’s already overfilled
Yeah
But it’s on the table
The fire’s cooking
And they’re farming babies
The slaves are all working
Blood is on the table
The mouths are all choking
But I’m goin’ hungry
Yeah
I don’t mind stealing bread
From the mouths of decadence
But I can’t feed on the powerless
When my cup’s already overfilled
But it’s on the table
The fire is cooking
And they’re farming babies
The slaves are all working
And it’s on the table
Their mouths are all choking
But I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
I don’t mind stealing bread (I don’t mind)
I don’t mind stealing bread
I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
I’m going hungry (Going hungry)
Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: CORNELL CHRISTOPHER J

Soul Asylum – Misery

From their 1995 album, Let Your Dim Light Shine. The song reached #20 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on July 15, 1995, and #1 on the Modern Rock Tracks chart.

From songfacts

In 1995, the Alternative/Modern Rock scene had become something corporate, as bands that led the way early in the decade found themselves under the constraints of the music industry. There was always a lot of angst to go along with the heavy guitars, but once it started selling, it was a completely different kind of misery: one that was feeding the machine.

Kurt Cobain, who killed himself in 1994, proved that this disconnect could have tragic consequences, but bands like Soul Asylum were already trapped in the cycle. The band was around for a decade before hitting it big with their 1992 album Grave Dancers Union and the hit single “Runaway Train.” Their newfound success solved their financial problems, but caused many new ones, as they were now obligated to promote and perform at a relentless pace. Their fanbase became wider but more shallow, and they found themselves too often in the company of folks who were dependent on them for revenue. All this led to “Misery,” the song lead singer Dave Pirner wrote to express his frustration.

The “factory” where misery is made is visualized in the video with scenes of a CD pressing plant making copies of the single. Soul Asylum’s record company had no problem with the critique, since the song was a hit, ironically feeding the machine it was disparaging.

“Misery” became Soul Asylum’s second-biggest Pop success (after “Runaway Train”) and also went to #1 on the Alternative Rock chart and #2 for Mainstream Rock.

Misery

They say misery loves company
We could start a company and make misery

Frustrated, Incorporated
Well I know just what you need
I might just have the thing
I know what you’d pay to see

Put me out of my misery
I’d do it for you, would you do it for me
We will always be busy making misery

We could build a factory and make misery
We’ll create the cure; we made the disease

Frustrated, Incorporated
Frustrated, Incorporated
Well I know just what you need
I might just have the thing
I know what you’d pay to feel

Put me out of my misery
All you suicide kings and you drama queens
Forever after happily, making misery

Did you satisfy your greed, get what you need
Was it only envy, so empty

Frustrated, Incorporated
Frustrated, Incorporated

Frustrated, Incorporated (put me out of my misery)
Frustrated, Incorporated (I’d do it for you, would you do it for me)
Frustrated, Incorporated (forever after happily)
Frustrated, Incorporated (making misery)
etc…Writer/s: ANDREW CAIRNS