David Bowie – Come And Buy My Toys

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Cinnamon/Mint/Parsley/Pepper/Rosemary/Sage/Salt/Thyme.

From his 1967 self titled debut album. The song did not chart.

From the Bowiebible.com

One of the simplest recordings on David Bowie’s 1967 debut album, ‘Come And Buy My Toys’ features just vocals, acoustic guitar and bass.

The song was recorded at Decca’s north London studios on 12 December 1966. It featured on guitar John Renbourn, with whom Bowie also recorded the unused album track ‘Bunny Thing’ on the same day.

Although many of the songs on David Bowie bore a dark heart at the centre of an outwardly innocent tale, ‘Come And Buy My Toys’ is pure nostalgic joy at the pleasures of childhood. Bowie presents an idyllic picture of youth, a blissful utopia before the toils of adulthood.

You’ve watched your father plough the fields with a ram’s horn
Sowed it wide with peppercorn and furrowed with a bramble thorn
Reaped it with a sharpened scyth, threashed it with a quill
The miller told your father that he’d work it with the greatest will
Now your watching’s over you must play with girls and boys
Leave the parsley on the stalls
Come and buy my toys

John Renbourn founded the folk group Pentangle shortly after recording with Bowie. ‘Come And Buy My Toys’ was a rare excursion into the genre for Bowie, whose acoustic guitar-led recordings tended to owe more to the likes of Dylan than the English folk tradition.

One source of inspiration may have been Simon and Garfunkel, whose album Parsley Sage Rosemary and Thyme had been released in October 1966. A number of words and phrases in ‘Come And Buy My Toys’ also appear in ‘Scarborough Fair’, including ram’s horn, parsley, peppercorn, and cambric shirt.

A more definite antecedent was the poem ‘A Toyman’s Address’, which appeared in volume 42 (1816) of The Monthly Magazine, a London publication to which, at various times, Charles Dickens, William Blake, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge contributed.

‘A Toyman’s Address’ was credited to “G.N.” in the issue, and subtitled “In the style of modern poetry”.

Smiling girls, rosy boys,
Here – come buy my little toys.
Mighty men of gingerbread
Crowd my stall, with faces red
A Toyman’s Address

Bowie made some minimal alterations before presenting the lines as his own:

Smiling girls and rosy boys
Come and buy my little toys
Monkeys made of gingerbread
And sugar horses painted red
‘Come And Buy My Toys’

‘A Toyman’s Address’ was also published in The Lady’s Magazine in 1816, and the opening lines became a traditional nursery rhyme, although how Bowie came to know them is not known.

 

Come And Buy My Toys

Smiling girls and rosy boys
Come and buy my little toys
Monkeys made of gingerbread
And sugar horses painted red
Rich men’s children running past
Their fathers dressed in hose
Golden hair and mud of many acres on their shoes
Gazing eyes and running wild
Past the stocks and over stiles
Kiss the window merry child
But come and buy my toys
You’ve watched your father plough the fields with a ram’s horn
Sowed it wide with peppercorn and furrowed with a bramble thorn
Reaped it with a sharpened scyth, thrashed it with a quill
The miller told your father that he’d work it with the greatest will
Now your watching’s over you must play with girls and boys
Leave the parsley on the stalls
Come and buy my toys
You shall own a cambric shirt
You shall work your father’s land
But now you shall play in the market square
Till you’ll be a man
Smiling girls and rosy boys
Come and buy my little toys
Monkeys made of gingerbread
And sugar horses painted red
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: David Bowie

Stevie Wonder – Someday At Christmas

The title song from his 1967 album. The song reached #17 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on December 18, 2015

From Songfacts

This was written by Motown songwriters Ron Miller and Bryan Wells, the team that also wrote Wonder’s songs “A Place in the Sun” and “Yester-me, Yester-you, Yesterday.” They wrote it for Wonder’s Christmas album, which contained several Christmas standards mixed with some new songs.
This is one of the first Christmas songs with a social and political message. Released during the Vietnam War, it takes a stand for peace and for equality and compassion. John Lennon sent a similar message in his 1971 song “Happy Xmas (War Is Over).”
In late 2015, Wonder performed the song with Andra Day for an Apple TV commercial. In 2016.

Someday At Christmas

Someday at Christmas men won’t be boys
Playing with bombs like kids play with toys
One warm December our hearts will see
A world where men are free
Someday at Christmas there’ll be no wars
When we have learned what Christmas is for
When we have found what life’s really worth
There’ll be peace on earth
Someday all our dreams will come to be
Someday in a world where men are free
Maybe not in time for you and me
But someday at Christmastime
Someday at Christmas we’ll see a Man
No hungry children, no empty hand
One happy morning people will share
Our world where people care
Someday at Christmas there’ll be no tears
All men are equal and no men have fears
One shinning moment my heart ran away
From our world today
Someday all our dreams will come to be
Someday in a world where men are free
Maybe not in time for you and me
But someday at Christmastime
Someday at Christmas man will not fail
Hate will be gone love will prevail
Someday a new world that we can start
With hope in every heart
Maybe not in time for you and me
But someday at Christmastime
Someday at Christmastime
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Bryan Wells / Ronald Miller

The Supremes – Reflections

The title song from their 1968 album, The song reached #4 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on September 9, 1967. I remember this song as the opening intro for the ABC show China Beach.

From Songfacts

“Reflections” was written by the Motown songwriting team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland. In a Songfacts interview with Dozier, he explained: “It’s about when the love has gone bad, or when things have changed in life. One thing in life that’s ever changing is tomorrow is always different from today. Things change for many reasons, and you have to be aware of why, and what is happening around you. You have to adapt to the changes in life. That’s what that was about: your reflection on how things used to be, can be and will be, hopefully.

It’s all about hope, too. The main theme of that song is hope: although things have come to pass, you have to start changing, remembering the old to get involved with a new approach in life.”

This song tells the story of a woman who looks back in anguish at her lost love, wondering what could have been had things worked out. But the song was directed in some ways at Motown head Barry Gordy, with the same sentiment.

Sonically, this was a departure for The Supremes, with no saxophone or prominent electric guitar backbeat. It retained the sturdy bassline of James Jamerson, but featured a Wurlitzer electric piano by Earl Van Dyke and tambourine by Jack Ashford. Pistol Allen was the drummer and Joe Messina added guitar. The oscillator-generated sound effects also appear throughout the track.

This was the first foray for The Supremes into psychedelic pop, a sound fully realized by The Beatles a month earlier when they released their Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album.

“Reflections” has some mind-bending lyrics:

Trapped in a world
that’s a distorted reality

It also opens with some trippy sound effects that were created with a custom oscillator designed by one of The Funk Brothers, who were session musicians for most Motown songs of the period. >>

This was released during The Summer of Love (1967) when the Vietnam War was raging. This made it an appropriate choice for the theme song of the TV series China Beach, which was set in Vietnam during the war. The series ran on ABC from 1988-1991.

Reflections

Through the mirror of my mind
Time after time
I see reflections of you and me

Reflections of
The way life used to be
Reflections of
The love you took from me

Oh, I’m all alone now
No love to shield me
Trapped in a world
That’s a distorted reality

Happiness you took from me
And left me all alone
With only memories

Through the mirror of my mind
Through all these tears that I’m crying
Reflects a hurt I can’t control
Although you’re gone
I keep holding on
To those happy times
Oh, girl when you were mine

As I peer through the windows
Of lost time
Keeping looking over my yesterdays
And all the love I gave all in vain
(All the love) All the love
That I’ve wasted
(All the tears) All the tears
That I’ve tasted
All in vain

Through the hollow of my tears
I see a dream that’s lost
From the hurt baby
That you have caused

Everywhere I turn
Seems like everything I see
Reflects a hurt I can’t control

In you I put
All my hope and trust
Right before my eyes
My whole world has turned to dust

Reflections of
The love you took from
Reflections of
The way life used to be

In you I put
All my hope and trust
Right before my eyes
My whole world has turned to dust

Now baby, why did you do it?
ReflectionsWriter/s: DAVID BRYAN BENOIT
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

The Beatles – Don’t Let Me Down

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams’s blog. This week’s prompt…Around/Down/Sideways/Up

The song reached #35 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on May 24, 1969.

From Songfacts

John Lennon dedicated this song to Yoko Ono. It was the first song he wrote for Yoko, whom he married on March 20, 1969.

Released as the B-side of “Get Back,” this song was recorded the same day. It was going to be on the Let It Be album, but when the tapes from the sessions were turned over to Phil Spector to produce, he took it out.

This was one of the songs The Beatles played at their impromptu rooftop concert in 1969. The concept of the album was The Beatles performing new songs for a live audience, with film footage of their rehearsals used to make a documentary TV special. George Harrison didn’t like the idea, and when things got tense during recording, he left the sessions and returned only after they agreed to cancel the live performance. The Beatles were still under contract to make another movie, so they decided to use the rehearsal footage as their last movie, Let It Be. In order to end the movie, they needed a big scene, so they went to the roof of Apple Records and started playing. John Lennon forgot some of the words to this song while the Beatles were playing their rooftop concert.

Billy Preston, who The Beatles met when he was on tour with Little Richard in 1962, played keyboards on this track. Preston was one of the few outside musicians (excluding members of orchestras) to play on any Beatles song. George Harrison brought him in to smooth tensions in the studio. He did the same thing during The White Album sessions, when he brought in Eric Clapton. The presence of a musician The Beatles respected had a way of making them put aside their differences.

Don’t Let Me Down

Don’t let me down, don’t let me down
Don’t let me down, don’t let me down

Nobody ever loved me like she does
Oh, she does, yeah, she does
And if somebody loved me like she do me
Oh, she do me, yes, she does

Don’t let me down, don’t let me down
Don’t let me down, don’t let me down

I’m in love for the first time
Don’t you know it’s gonna last
It’s a love that lasts forever
It’s a love that had no past

Don’t let me down, don’t let me down
Don’t let me down, don’t let me down

And from the first time that she really done me
Oh, she done me, she done me good
I guess nobody ever really done me
Oh, she done me, she done me good

Don’t let me down, don’t let me down
Don’t let me downWriter/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney

 

Lovin’ Spoonful – Never Going Back

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams blog. This week’s theme…Bus/Truck/Lorry.

From their 1969 album, Revelation: Revolution 69. The song reached #73 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on August 3, 1968.

Never Going Back

Everytime I see that Greyhound
Bus go roll-inґ down the line
Makes me wish I talked much more to you
When we had all that time
Still it’s only wishinґ and I know it’s nothin’ more
So I’m
Never goin’ back,
Never goin’ back,
Never goin’ back
Oh to Nashville anymore
Oklahoma City, yes I
Know that she won’t treat me cruel
Denver, Colorado,
Never made me feel like such a fool
These are only cities
But they’re cities without you
So I’m
Never goinґ back
Never goinґ back
Never goin’ back
Oh to Nashville anymore
Still it’s only wishinґ and I know it’s nothin’ more
So I’m
Never goin’ back,
Never goin’ back,
Never goin’ back
Oh to Nashville anymore
Everytime I see that Greyhound
Bus go roll-inґ down the line
Makes me wish I talked much more to you
When we had all that time
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: John C. Stewart

Marty Robbins – Don’t Worry…The country song that changed Rock and Roll

The song peaked at #1 on Billboards Hot Country song chart and #3 on Billboards Hot 100 chart on March 19, 1961.

From wideopencountry

Due to an error in the recording process, Marty Robbins’ 1961 single “Don’t Worry” impacted more than the country and pop charts at the time. Before the Beatles made it to the States, inspiring teenagers across the country to form bands, an otherwise typical love ballad by Robbins accidentally introduced the listening public to electric guitar “fuzz” effects.

Grady Martin, a rockabilly and county legend and A-list session musician, was the secret weapon behind Robbins’ “El Paso,” Loretta Lynn’s “Coal Miner’s Daughter” and other all-time great recordings. On “Don’t Worry,” he played six-string bass. A relatively tame song sounds way different when Martin’s solo begins about the 1:25 mark. He’d run his instrument through a faulty mixing console. As a result, it sounded like he’d stirred up a nest of metallic hornets.

Apparently, Martin didn’t care for the effect. Producer Don Law disagreed, leaving the unusual wrinkle in the final cut. The decision didn’t hinder the song’s success. In addition to becoming Robbins’ seventh number one country hit, it ranked as high as third on the pop chart.

Whatever hesitations Martin may have had about guitar fuzz must not have lasted. He built a whole song around the effect, fittingly titled The Fuzz,” and recorded it with his band the Slewfoot Five. It was released the same year as “Don’t Worry.”

Session engineer Glen Snoddy also took advantage of the situation. He hung onto the faulty mixing channel and made it available to other artists. By 1962, Snoddy helped sell the idea for a fuzz pedal to the Gibson Guitar Corporation.

The effect appeared in a handful of future country songs, including Carl Butler’s Wonder Drug,” Kay Adam’s Little Pink Mac and most famously, Merle Haggard’s The Running Kind.” But for the most part, it’s associated with rock music, especially after the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards used it to simulate the sound of a horn on 1965’s “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.”

Don’t Worry

Don’t worry ’bout me, it’s all over now
Though I may be blue, I’ll manage somehow
Love can’t be explained, can’t be controlled
One day it’s warm, next day it’s cold

Don’t pity me, ’cause I’m feeling blue
Don’t be ashamed it might happen to you
Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, love, kiss me
One time then go love, I’ll understand
Don’t worry ’bout me

Sweet, sweet, sweet, love will I want you to be
As happy as I when you love me
I’ll never forget you your sweet memory it’s all over now
Don’t worry bout me

When one heart tells one heart, one heart goodbye
One heart is free, one heart will cry
Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh sweet, sweet baby, sweet baby, sweet
It’s all right, don’t worry ’bout me…

Jimi Hendrix – Angel

This is my contribution to Song Lyric Sunday for Jim Adams blog. This weeks theme is Bird/Fly/Sky/Wing.

From songfacts.

Hendrix got the idea for this from a dream where his mother came down from heaven to take him with her.
Hendrix started working on this in 1967 along with “Little Wing,” which was a similar song. He gave up on it, but pulled it out and recorded it on July 23, 1970 – just a few months before his death on September 18, 1970.
Mitch Mitchell used a variable frequency oscillator to get an unusual sound. He didn’t like the way it came out and rerecorded his part in October 1970 after the death of Hendrix. >>

 

Angel

Angel came down from heaven yesterday
She stayed with me just long enough to recue he
And she told me a story yesterday,
about the sweet love between the moon and the deep blue sea
And then she spread her wings high over me
She said she’s gonna come back tomorrow

And I said “fly on my sweet angel,
fly on through the sky,
fly on my sweet angel,
tomorrow I’m gonna be by your side”

Sure enough this morning came unto me
Silver wings silhouetted against the child’s sunrise
And my angel sha said unto
“today is the day for you to rise,
Take my hand, you’re gonna be my man,
you’re gonna rise”
And she took high over yonder

And I said “fly on my sweet angel,
fly on through the sky,
fly on my sweet angel,
forever I will be by your side”

Linda Lyndell – What A Man

The song reached #50 on Billboards R&B chart on August 24, 1968.

From Wikipedia

What a Man” is a song written by Dave Crawford, and originally recorded for Stax Records‘ Volt imprint by Linda Lyndell, The song was sampled and reinterpreted as “Whatta Man” in 1993 by Salt-n-Pepa with En Vogue; the version became a commercial success. In 2011, the German singer Lena Meyer-Landrut (credited as Lena) covered the song while retaining the original title and lyrics.

Linda Lyndell, a white singer who had been a support act with James Brown and Ike & Tina Turner and then recommended to Stax Records by Otis Redding, recorded “What a Man”. The song was essentially improvised by Lyndell, record producer Dave Crawford, and the Stax studio musicians in Memphis, Tennessee. It was released as a single in 1968 with the B-side track “I Don’t Know”; both songs were credited to and produced by Dave Crawford. The single entered the Billboard Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart on August 24, 1968 and then peaked at number 50. The record came to the attention of white supremacists in the Ku Klux Klan, who threatened Lyndell for associating with black musicians; as a result, she largely withdrew from the music business for the next 25 years.

What A Man

I get lovin’ (lovin’)
By the hundred
And I get lovin’ (lovin’), yeah
By the pint
Got me doin’ the camel walk
In my sleep
Make me do the James Brown
Every time I get on my feet
Listen to me
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty good man
Say it again now
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty good man
Yes he is
A mighty mighty good man
Let me put it on your mind
Let me put it on your mind
He thrills me, kills me
He’s a lovin’ kind
Another ounce of his love
And I think I’m a gonna slip
Lose my grip
And do back over flips
Listen now
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty mighty good man
Say it again now
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty good man, yeah
What a man
And deep inside I know it
What a man
And I’m not ashamed to show it
Yeah
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty mighty good man
Say it again now
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty, mighty good man
Yes he is
He can do, good god
He can do the funky broadway
Yes he can
The funky four corner
He can back up
Back up and do the tighten up
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty, mighty good man
Yeah, yeah yeah
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty good man
Yes he is
What a man, what a man, what a man
What a mighty, mighty good man
Mighty, mighty, mighty, good man
Good man, good good, oh mighty, mighty

Brenda Lee – Ride, Ride, Ride

The song was released in 1967 and never charted. The song was written by country singer Lynn Anderson. That’s all the information that I could find on this song. The song really swings.

Ride, Ride, Ride

If you don’t want me, baby
If you’re not satisfied
If you don’t care
Get on your horse
And ride, ride, ride
Since you got on your high horse
Those fancy friends you’ve found
You have a hard time seeing me
You’re always looking down
If you don’t want me, baby
If you’re not satisfied
If you don’t care
Get on your horse
And ride, ride, ride
You talk about me, honey
You try to tear me down
But while you’re throwing dirt on me
You’re slowly losing ground
If you don’t want me, baby
If you’re not satisfied
If you don’t care
Get on your horse
And ride, ride, ride
I had your second fiddle
Returned to you today
‘Cause, baby, that’s one instrument
I’ve never learned to play
If you don’t want me, baby
If you’re not satisfied
If you don’t care
Get on your horse
And ride, ride, ride
Ride, ride, ride
Ride, ride, ride
Ride, ride, ride…
Source: Musixmatch

Otis Redding – Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay

The song reached #1 in 1968 and stayed at that position for four weeks on Billboards Hot 100 chart. It was recorded November 22 and December 7 at Stax Studios in Memphis, TN. The backing band was Booker T. Jones and Isaac Hayes on keyboards. Steve Cropper on Guitar. Donald (Duck) Dunn on bass. Al Jackosn Jr on drums. Wayne Jackson on trumpet and trombone and Andrew Love on saxophone. Redding continued to tour after the recording sessions. On December 10, his charter plane crashed into Lake Monona, outside Madison, Wisconsin. Redding and six others were killed. After Redding’s death, Cropper mixed “Dock of the Bay” at Stax Studios. He added the sound of seagulls and waves crashing to the background, as Redding had requested, recalling the sounds he heard when he was staying on the houseboat.

From Billboard.

“(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay was co-written by Redding and M.G.’s guitarist Steve Cropper as the soul legend was looking to expand his audience to the pop and rock worlds, a crossover he’d begun in earnest with his incendiary performance at the Monterey Pop Festival in the summer of 1967. He was inspired by The Beatles’ recently released Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band to add newfound detail and depth to the lyrics and production of his music, and he started writing “Dock,” appropriately enough, while on the houseboat of famed rock promoter Bill Graham.

Because of its laconic vibe, accessible melody and whistling outro — which Redding didn’t originally intend to keep — manager Phil Walden worried the song would be seen as “too pop” for his artist, who’d made his name largely on fiery, horn-led stomps and frenzied vocal performances. And “pop” the song certainly was — but it was also possibly Redding’s richest composition to date, a mix of blissful Stax stillness and profound existential anxiety that showed a complex level of contemplative soul previously unexplored on the pop charts.

Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay

Sittin’ in the mornin’ sun
I’ll be sittin’ when the evenin’ comes
Watchin’ the ships roll in
Then I watch ’em roll away again
I’m sittin’ on the dock of the bay
Watchin’ the tide, roll away
I’m sittin’ on the dock of the bay
Wastin’ time
I left my home in Georgia
And I headed for the Frisco Bay
‘Cause I’ve got nothin’ to live for
Looks like nothin’s gonna come my way, so
I’m just come sittin’ on the dock of the bay
Watchin’ the tide roll away
I’m sittin’ on the dock of the bay, wastin’ time
Looks like nothin’s gonna change
Everything seems to stay the same
I can’t do what ten people tell me to do
So I guess I’ll remain the same
I’m sittin’ here restin’ my bones
And this loneliness won’t leave me alone
This two thousand miles I roamed
Just to make this dock my home
Now I’m just sittin’ on the dock of the bay
Watchin’ the tide roll away
Sittin’ on the dock of the bay
I’m wastin’ time
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Steve Cropper / Otis Redding